7 Traits of parents with successful children

7 Traits of parents with successful children

There is no set manual to follow when it comes to raising successful children but psychological research has narrowed down a few factors that will most likely result in success. It comes as no surprise that a majority of the responsibility lies with the parents. Although, it is not entirely up to the parents, there are a few things parents with successful children have in common. Let’s look at 7 traits of parents with successful children.

Make them do Chores: Making children do chores from a young age will teach your child that hard work pays off. Most importantly, chores also imprint a sense of responsibility on a child.  Always ensure the chores are age appropriate and that they do receive some type of praise or remuneration for it. Chores can range from picking up toys and putting it back inside the box, washing dishes, mowing the lawn or walking the dog.

Give them pocket money: Give children pocket money, whether it is in a form of payment for chores they have completed or an allowance they get on a weekly or monthly basis. It will teach them the value of money and also how to work with their money.  It is important, however, not to give them more money when they run out of their own. This will defeat the purpose. They also need to learn the importance of saving, even if it is saving for a fancy bicycle or a new gaming centre they would like to have. You can sit down with them and work out a weekly budget, teaching them how to set out money for spending and money for saving.

Teach them to not be afraid of failure: “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work and learning from failure” – Colin Powell. You want your kids to develop a growth mindset. You want them to view failure, which is inevitable, as a chance to learn and grow – not as a dead end. They need to learn to keep at it and not give up on the first try.

Let them learn to be tolerant:  Being tolerant to different types of people with different personalities is a very important trait to have. It is just wrong if a person looks down on another. Your child should learn to be the Good Samaritan. This will result in great respect from their peers. In addition, children should also learn the principle of putting themselves in other people’s shoes first before judging. That way they can understand why certain things happen and how to deal with these situations when they arise. For example, you can introduce this by explaining why a school bully might be acting out in a certain way.

Encourage entrepreneurship:  Based on research by Bill Murphy Jr., a renowned entrepreneur, the majority of today’s entrepreneurs were encouraged to act like entrepreneurs at an early age. These included personally observing an entrepreneur while growing up and being constantly challenged by their parents to come up with ways that they think they can make money. You can help your child by setting up a lemonade stand in the front yard to sell to the neighbourhood and taking part in school market days.

Praise them for hard work:  The way we praise our children has an effect on how they view their success. When they earn a high score on a math test or win a sports trophy, it is important to praise them for their hard work and perseverance, not just telling them that their success was a direct result of them being smart or talented. Although we want to compliment our children, we also want them to know that although they have a natural talent, hard work is always required and that it always pays off. This will nurture a growth mindset.  If we do not praise them in this way, their confidence can suffer a knock when they try and don’t succeed at first.

Remember to be their role model:  From the day they are born our children look up to us as their parents. We are the first example of trust, love, empathy and respect they will have in this world. How we deal with failure and how we celebrate success is constantly being observed by our children.  You need to set examples of the type of person you would like your child to be. The “do as I say, not as I do” method is not one that often succeeds. You want your child to trust you and strive to be like you, not to obey you out of fear of being punished for not following the rules. It is likely that the moment you are not around, they might just do the exact opposite of what they were told.  They need to want to follow the rules. They need to want to succeed because you succeeded.

Raising a successful child is a conversation that many of us parents have engaged in before and one that can carry on for an infinite amount of time. We hope you found this topic insightful.

GT Scholars strives in providing mentoring, tutoring and enrichment to children from diverse backgrounds. Feel free to contact us to find out how GT scholars can help your child reach even higher heights.

Marilyn

Marilyn

Recruitment Manager at GT Scholars
Prior to working with GT Scholars, Marilyn spent most of her professional career in administration and management within the aviation industry. She served as an internal auditor and quality assurance manager within the aviation industry. Marilyn currently works with GT Scholars operations as part of the recruitment and programme management team, she enjoys designing systems and procedures, as well as overseeing them in practical use.
Marilyn
Growth mindset Parents What's new?

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