Friends of GT Scholars –  Do you know any young people interested in coding?

Friends of GT Scholars – Do you know any young people interested in coding?

Friends of GT Scholars

The weekend is almost here! I hope you’re having a great Friday so far and that the day will turn out to be a perfect start to your weekend. Today’s newsletter is really special to me because it marks the 100th newsletter to be published! Thanks for your continued support and for staying tuned! It’s been great getting the Friends of GT Scholars to your inbox every week!

Do you know any young people interested in coding?
For the first time ever, we’ve been able to offer more places on our skill building days by running the workshops on multiple days! We’ve got Google Academy London to thank for that!  We’ll be running a series of workshops next week during October half-term. These workshops will give young people the chance to learn new coding skills or build on their existing coding skills.  There are a few more spaces left for #GirlMeetsCode. If you know of a young girl between 11-16 who’d like to join us on Tuesday, 22nd October please get in touch with me, we have a special Friends of GT discount code she can use!

Event volunteers needed!
We’re looking for a few more event volunteers to help us at next week’s coding workshops at Google Academy. As an event volunteer, you’ll be helping by welcoming attendees, handing out workshop materials and helping with lunch arrangements. The first workshop, on Tuesday 22nd October, is a girls only event, followed by two more workshops on Wednesday 23rd and Thursday 24th which are open to all young people. Workshops will run from 10am to 4pm and you can support for a full day or half day, depending on your availability. Please let me know if you can help on any of these days!

Kick off your first tutoring session with a bang!
This week marked the start of our second intake of scholars on the mentoring and tutoring programmes for this term. Out of over 250 applications that we received, we’ve been able to give 22 places to young people to some extremely talented and ambitious young people. If you’ve confirmed your availability you’ll soon hear from us with more information on scholar matches this term. If you’re already thinking of ideas to make your tutoring sessions fun, then this blog will definitely have a few ideas you can use and add to your tutoring sessions. 

Have a fantastic weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Friends of GT Scholars – Can you help us reach more volunteers?

Friends of GT Scholars – Can you help us reach more volunteers?

What's new?

Friday is here! It’s definitely one of my favourite days of the week, especially if it is a sunny one like today. The weather forecast for the weekend also looks very promising so I hope you’ve got something fun planned! But before the weekend officially starts, take a minute or two to read this week’s newsletter!

Volunteer English and Maths Tutors needed!
We’re looking to recruit more volunteer Maths and English tutors to be matched with our new intake of scholars. We provide all the training needed, the tutoring is all done online and you’ll need to be able to commit to 1 hour a week for 12 weeks! If you know of a friend or colleague that would make a great tutor, please forward this email to them or refer them to our contact page

Can you volunteer next term as a mentor?
Mentors can help build their mentees’ confidence to pursue their aspirations, especially when it comes to young people who need to make decisions about their future, shedding some much-needed light on subject choices, university and different career opportunities. You’ll need to be available for 2hrs a month for at least 6 months. Please get in touch if you’d like to apply or you’d like to know more!

What will the future of education look like?
In today’s fast-paced world, the concept of education is ever-changing and needs to adapt to the way every new generation thinks. New innovative methods are needed to help young people learn effectively. One of our recent blogs talks about what education might look like in the future and how we can help young people prepare for it. Click here to read the full blog.

Have a great weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Friends of GT Scholars – Have you heard about the Big Give Christmas Challenge?

Friends of GT Scholars – Have you heard about the Big Give Christmas Challenge?

Parent Spotlight What's new?

Happy Friday! I hope that you’ve had a brilliant start to the day so far and that you are excited for the weekend! We’ve got a few things lined up in this week’s newsletter that we’d like to share with you, including more information on a fundraising challenge we’re taking on.

 The Big Give Challenge

The Big Give Challenge is an annual campaign used to raise money for charities like ours! This year, we’re raising money for the Raising Aspirations Programme for looked after children and we would really appreciate your support by either pledging a donation before August or giving a donation after August when our Big Give page is launched! Pledges will be used to double donations once the page goes live! Pledges are secured by completing this form and you can find out more about the challenge here

Are you an SEO expert?
We are looking for someone who’s SEO savvy to help us to optimise our search engine ranking. In this volunteer role, you’ll need to work with our comms & impact manager, Kelen and lead a project to help us increase our google page ranking. If this volunteer opportunity sounds like the right fit for you, then please let me know by replying this email or fill out this volunteer skills survey if you’d like to offer other specialist skills!

Interview with a parent
A couple of week’s ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing a parent who’s daughter just finished her first term at GT Scholars. The scholar benefited tremendously from the online tutoring, so much that she’s moved up a whole set in Maths and is now one of the top two students in her class. It’s always great to receive positive feedback like this and to know that we were able to make a difference. You can follow this link to read the full interview. 

Have a super weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Friends of GT Scholars – Are you SEO savvy?

Friends of GT Scholars – Are you SEO savvy?

What's new?

It’s Friday and it also happens to be 50 years since the first moon landing took place! That’s already two reasons to have an awesome day! Today’s officially the last day of the term and we just wanted to say thank you to everyone who volunteered during the term! Why don’t you sit back, enjoy this week’s newsletter, rest assured that the weekend is about to start!

We need an SEO guru!
We’re looking for an SEO savvy volunteer to help us optimise our search engine ranking. If you’re a ninja with keywords and know your meta descriptions from your meta tags, then you’re definitely someone who can save us from the depths of page 10! As an SEO guru, you’ll work with our comms & impact manager, Kelen and lead a project to help us climb the ladder of Google! If this sounds like the right volunteer opportunity for you then please let me know by replying this email! You can also fill out this volunteer skills survey if you can help provide specialist skills in a different way!

Volunteer Spotlight
Over the next few weeks, we’ll be sharing our latest volunteer and scholar spotlight interviews of tutors, mentors and scholars who participated in the programme this term. We’ve still got a few spots left in our schedule and would love for you to feature in one of our volunteer spotlight interviews if you’ve volunteered in the last 6 months. If you feel up for it, let me know and I will schedule a time and date with you.

Tried our Volunteer Persona Quiz yet?
Have you taken our Volunteer Persona Quiz yet? This quiz is quick, easy and fun to take and can help you understand where you fit in best in our volunteer community. It will only take 2-minutes to complete and it would be great if you could let me know your thoughts on it and also share the link to the quiz with your friends!

Have a great weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Friends of GT Scholars – Thank you for your help this term!

Friends of GT Scholars – Thank you for your help this term!

What's new?

Happy Friday! The week has finally come to an end and it’s time to get ready for the weekend. I hope you have some exciting plans lined up or perhaps you’re getting ready for a well-deserved summer holiday? But before the week ends, I’d just like five minutes of your time to share a few things with you. 

It’s been a great term!
The end of term is here and we’ve been receiving really good feedback from our scholars and parents. We would like to thank everyone for their dedication and hard work and for making this term a successful one. Your support is valued and doesn’t go unnoticed. We’ve got a bit of time before the next term starts, but if you’re thinking about volunteering as a tutor or mentor in the new academic year, starting in September, please let me know by sending a quick email.

Short term volunteer opportunities!
We also have some great one-off volunteer opportunities, that won’t take up too much of your time, that you to get involved with over the summer. Some of these include writing a guest blog, sharing our page on social media platforms, participating in our spotlight series and suggesting potential venues for our meetups and workshops. If you’re interested in getting involved, please send me a quick email and I’ll give you a call to fill you in on the details.

Opportunities with Bright Network

We’ve recently partnered with Bright Network – a careers platform that helps you discover opportunities throughout university and connects you to world-leading employers, including Google, Monzo, Teach First, J.P. Morgan and more. Their upskilling and networking events are considered some of the best around, especially the Bright Network Festival, you can check out the highlights from 2018 here. It’s completely free to become a member and you can sign up with this exclusive link for GT Scholars.

 

Have a fantastic weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Friends of GT Scholars – Could you feature in the next Volunteer Spotlight?

Friends of GT Scholars – Could you feature in the next Volunteer Spotlight?

Volunteers What's new?

I hope your week has been great so far? The end of term is almost here and we’re just wrapping up a few last things before school closes for the summer. Why not take a short break and read through this week’s newsletter?

Feature in the Volunteer Spotlight series!

If you’re currently volunteering or have volunteered as a tutor or mentor sometime during this year, we’d love for you to feature in our upcoming volunteer spotlight series! This is a great way for us to celebrate the difference you’ve made and give others an idea of what it’s like to volunteer with GT Scholars. Please let me know if you’d be interested and we can schedule a short phone interview!

Become a volunteer English Tutor!
The current term is coming to an end which means that we’re already thinking about September! The next term will be starting in late September/early October and will run until December 2019. I know September seems like a long time away but feel free to let me know if you’ll be able to volunteer next term. Last term we were a bit short on English tutors, so if you’d like to tutor up to GCSE Maths or English for one hour a week, please get in touch with me!

Why volunteer mentoring?

Mentoring is so much more than just helping your mentee grow and reach aspirations. A mentoring relationship is mutually beneficial and can be very rewarding. Not only can you make a noticeable difference in a young person’s life, but you can also develop your skills as well. Follow this link to one of our latest blogs where we’ve listed 7 useful skills that you can gain from volunteer mentoring.

Have a fantastic weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Great Ideas For One-to-One Tutoring Sessions

Great Ideas For One-to-One Tutoring Sessions

Volunteers What's new?

Tutoring should be a fulfilling experience for your scholar and for yourself. It should not be something that will be dreaded by your scholar and it should be something that is different from how your scholar learns at school.

With that being said, there can sometimes be a tug-of-war between trying to keep the tutoring sessions serious to complete the task at hand and making the sessions enjoyable. Creating a balance between the two is key, and once you are able to achieve that, you will find yourself looking forward to the tutoring sessions with your scholar and they will run more smoothly and effectively. 

One thing to keep in mind is to maintain your structure in terms of the content you intend to teach and the goals you have for those sessions, but be flexible in how you deliver the content and also how you interact with your scholar. Here are a few ideas you can use to keep your tutoring sessions energetic and effective.

Use icebreakers
Your first one-to-one tutoring session can be nerve-wracking for both you and your scholar. One of the ways to combat this feeling is to create or implement session icebreakers. This is a good way to get both of you comfortable and a good way to get to know a bit more about each other beyond the formalities of tutor and scholar. These icebreakers can simply be a 5-minute discussion about general topics outside of the planned content. These discussions can also help you to find the best ways to make the sessions most effective for your scholar.

Personalise your sessions
It is one thing to tutor someone, and another to tutor them effectively and produce the best results. It is important to find out more about your scholar and what they are looking to get out of your sessions and also what they want to personally achieve at school and beyond. Once you can establish a general outline for the first few sessions, you can personalise the sessions in a way which works well for both you and your scholar. 

Be supportive
Providing your scholar with support during each of your one-to-one sessions can greatly improve the way in which you interact with one another and it helps to boost their confidence. You need to be encouraging and to show them that the tutoring sessions are a safe space for them to be open about the areas or topics they struggle in. This will allow them to feel more comfortable and confident in how they approach the content you are tutoring, as well as establishing a respectful and comfortable relationship with you as their tutor. 

Encourage independent thinking
Tutoring is also important for encouraging your scholar to think independently. The idea behind this is to foster a growth mindset within your scholar so that they are able to tackle tasks independently and build their self-confidence. One way to do this is to help them to stand on their own feet and to think beyond the assistance you provide. During your tutoring sessions, you can create a short quiz or other mentally stimulating techniques that will help your scholar to build confidence in the subject and to not be dependent on your teachings alone. This will shift their perspective on how they approach topics, and it will promote their ability to think critically.

Engage your scholar
Another way to make your one-to-one tutoring sessions more productive and fun for both you and your scholar is to keep them engaged. During the session, you can get your scholar to actively participate by asking questions as the session progresses. If you only wait to ask questions at the end, you might lose their attention during the session. Keeping them engaged also creates room for them to ask any questions they may have regarding a particular topic and it allows them to better understand the topics being presented. 

Switch gears
Rather than sticking to the conventional methods of tutoring, you should use different methods to relay the information to your scholar. There are tons of learning tools available for you to use such as online videos, presentations, and other content. Introducing different learning tools makes the sessions less monotonous and more engaging, and it creates different ways for your scholar to learn and retain information. You can also get your scholar to participate by getting them to create short presentations to go over the content and pose any questions they may have for you at the end of their presentation. Furthermore, you can also incorporate the use of funny gifs or memes to get a particular point across. Just as long as it does not take away from the effectiveness of your tuition and their ability to learn, you should always explore new ways to teach your scholar.

Get their feedback
It takes two to tango, and feedback should not only be for you to give but also for you to receive from your scholar. Allow them to express and share their thoughts through feedback sessions, and be open to any constructive criticism. This feedback can then be used to learn how best to work with and for each other through your sessions.

For many scholars, learning can seem like such a task. However, your tutoring sessions should shed a different light on learning and stimulate their desire to learn. So don’t be afraid to try something new in your sessions and give you and your scholar something to always look forward to.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

How To Keep Your Scholar Interested In Their Tutoring Sessions

How To Keep Your Scholar Interested In Their Tutoring Sessions

Volunteers What's new?

Being a tutor can be one of the most satisfying and fulfilling roles a person can take on. The opportunity to get to help and guide a young person to improve academically and seeing their progress from the hours you put in during tutoring is worth the time and effort invested.

However, tutoring can sometimes be challenging when trying to keep the momentum and enthusiasm going from the first session to the last session with a scholar. But, there are a few things you can do as a tutor to avoid this or in some cases get out of this slump. Here are a few ways to keep your scholar interested in their tutoring sessions.

Understanding your Scholar
One of the best ways to avoid the disinterest of a scholar is to understand them from the get-go, including what works best for them in terms of grasping concepts and how they relate to you. A constructive way to go about this is to make sure that they are comfortable enough to be able to discuss any potential issues that may or may not arise in the time that you are tutoring them. To do this, you need to create a safe space for your sessions. In creating this safe space, it is also important to establish boundaries with your scholar regarding respect for your role and understanding that there are also rules to ensure that you can do your best as their tutor.

Mutual Feedback
Another avenue to explore is having regular feedback sessions with your scholar. These can focus on one of two aspects. The first aspect is where you ask them how they are finding the tutoring sessions with you and if you are engaging them enough and relaying your knowledge well enough that they are able to comprehend everything. This can be done after your session or you can get them to fill out a questionnaire you’ve prepared via email correspondence. This will let you know where you stand as a tutor and whether the way in which you approach the sessions is working.

The second aspect is where you give them feedback on their progress and the areas you feel they should work on outside of the tutoring sessions. How you approach this feedback session is very important and this is where understanding your scholar also plays in. Some scholars are sensitive to constructive criticism, which can be due to a lack of confidence. So it is important that you give them feedback in the friendliest way possible. It’s also important to reward and praise any progress made. If they feel that you as a tutor don’t see or acknowledge the strides that they are making, it can cause a nonchalant approach towards future sessions and work assigned to them.

Switch Gears
During your time as their tutor, it would be good to implement different approaches to each session in order to keep boredom and disinterest at bay. Incorporating fun but effective elements to the sessions such as interactive games or quizzes can create new ways of learning topics. As long as they do not distract from the learning, these activities foster a positive environment for your scholar to flourish and learn.

When it comes to the structure of the sessions, it is good to be consistent but it’s also important to make sure it’s interactive and inviting. If they enjoy the session, it makes the task at hand easier to approach and the learning more effective. Other elements that you can look into are visual elements such as pictures, GIFs and memes that are related to the topic. You can also use short videos and other activities that stimulate the brain. This will ensure that your scholar leaves your tutoring sessions feeling enlightened and energised.

The Scholar becomes the Master
“But I’m the tutor!” Yes, you most certainly are. This role reversal simply means that you designate the last few minutes to let your scholar teach you what you have taught them in that session. This helps the scholar revise what they have learnt and it also helps you to determine how they are grasping and handling the content you are teaching them. It doesn’t have to be the entire session’s work, but key components of the session that you want to make sure they have understood.

This can also be a spur-of-the-moment test to help them develop their ability to think on their feet and build their confidence in the subject. It also pushes them to revise their work more so that they are not caught off guard in future sessions. This exercise is also beneficial to you as the tutor as you get to observe how effective your tutoring has been and how to improve on it. It fosters growth for both you and your scholar.

Have Patience
Having patience when tutoring a scholar is one of the most important necessities. Some scholars require more time to grasp concepts than others, so you need to be patient with them. Having patience also allows you to take a step back and be more understanding and accommodating of your scholar and it sets the tone between the two of you. It will show them that you are happy to help them and it will encourage them when they are struggling. Patience also goes a long way for many scholars and it is a contributing factor to how your scholar participates and adjusts to your tutoring over the course of the programme.

Tutoring is a rewarding experience that positively impacts you and your scholar in more ways than one. If you feel like you would like to help in making a difference in the lives of young people, then you definitely should volunteer to be a GT Scholars tutor.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Friends of GT Scholars – Can you volunteer at our Summer Workshop?

Friends of GT Scholars – Can you volunteer at our Summer Workshop?

Volunteers What's new?

It’s Friday, let’s start the countdown to the weekend! But before the weekend break, I’d like to ask your help for an upcoming workshop,  share an interesting blog with you and also ask you to connect us on social media.

Coding Workshop Facilitators needed
We’re still looking for workshop facilitators that can help us run and create content for our summer coding workshop. GT Scholars in collaboration with Cyber Hive and Caius House are running the #DayOfCode workshop for young people between the ages of 11 to 16. The workshop will run from Tuesday 6th August to Thursday 8th August at Caius House in Battersea. If you or someone you know would be interested, please get in touch with me.

Help us Narrow the attainment gap
A vision that’s shared with our volunteers is to help young people achieve their full potential. It’s a widely known fact that private tuition, coaching, and enrichment programmes are expensive and not accessible to young people from low incomes, thus contributing to the widening of the attainment gap. But there is a way we can help narrow the attainment gap. Follow this link to our blog to read more about the challenges young people from low-income homes face and how we provide them with access to high-quality programmes. Please get in touch to find out how to get involved.

Connect us with your friends
Help us leverage the power of social media by following us on any of our social media pages. Whether you decide to like, share, tweet or follow, we have a social media page you can connect to and share with your friends. Find us on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram and keep a lookout for volunteer stories, spotlights, and other related education and social mobility content.

Have a wonderful weekend!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Can Volunteer Tutoring Boost Your CV?

Can Volunteer Tutoring Boost Your CV?

Volunteers What's new?

When it comes to volunteer tutoring, it is often thought that only those on the receiving end of the volunteering service are being benefited. However, there are many short-term and long-term benefits that volunteer tutors receive when they choose to take on this role. One of these benefits is how this volunteer tutor role can boost your CV.

When a potential employer is going through your CV, they will always assess what extracurricular work you have done. When they see that you have previously taken on the role of a volunteer tutor, it reveals a few things about your character and the kind of person they would be bringing on board to work for them.

It shows initiative
Taking on the initiative to be a volunteer tutor is a great way to get your foot in the door to the working world. Potential employers will see that you are not primarily driven by money and that you are willing to put in work when it is needed without being prompted to do so. It shows that the betterment of others is something you take into consideration and that you are also able to think beyond yourself. It also shows that you are proactive and willing to go the extra mile.

More exposure for you
By becoming a volunteer tutor you create more opportunities for yourself to be seen. It makes your CV more captivating to potential employers and gives them an insight into how you spend your time outside of university or work and an overlook of your skills and capabilities. The opportunity to be a volunteer tutor also puts you in an environment you may not usually be exposed to, and in doing so, it allows you to meet other undergraduates and professionals who may be able to pass your CV to other people. This creates a platform for you to network with different peers your age who may also be volunteer tutors, as well as potential organisations you may want to work with in the future. Taking on the role of a volunteer tutor can also expose you to different potential career paths that you can look into.

Improved skills and experience
In as much as you are helping someone else improve their skills through your volunteer tutoring, you are also improving your skills and experience in the process. You have to find ways to be able to relate to the scholars you teach and find ways to relay the information you know to them. This improves with every tutoring session you have and helps to sharpen your communication, leadership, interpersonal, and performance skills. Being a volunteer tutor also helps with improving your thinking skills and personal development. In doing this, it gives you the right skills and experience for the workplace and under different conditions and environments.

Time management
Becoming a volunteer tutor requires you to have good time management in order to balance your academic career and personal time as well as being a tutor. It shows potential employers your organisational skills and how well you are able to manage the demands of studying and tutoring while working under pressure in some instances. Employers like to see that their potential employees have good time management skills and are able to allocate their time accordingly and prioritise different tasks effectively. Taking on the role of a volunteer tutor is also a good way to utilise spare time and learning how to manage that.

Preparation for the future
Being a volunteer tutor helps to prepare you for working environments and other future roles you may look into pursuing. Even though you have the free will to undertake your tutoring sessions in times that work well for both you and your scholar, you still work under a specific structure and you must still meet the required hours as well as produce certain results with regards to your scholar. You also have to maintain a standard of integrity and abide by the rules that govern the volunteers within that organisation. This shows potential employers that you have the ability to follow instructions and how well you are able to fulfil designated tasks and work independently.

It shows that you are reliable
Becoming a volunteer tutor is one thing, but doing the job that is required of you is another. When taking on the role, you have to ensure that you will be able to fully apply yourself to the role. This is an aspect that potential employers look at – how reliable you are and how well do you perform in your role? The more reliable you prove to be, the higher your chances of growing professionally are and the more people trust you to do things that require greater responsibility.

An opportunity for personal enrichment
Lastly, being a volunteer tutor creates room for your own personal enrichment. It helps you discover strengths or interests you may not have known that you had, and it provides you with a different perspective on how you can approach your career and personal life. There are always lessons to be learnt and growth to be experienced when you open your mind to new possibilities. You also learn some of the things that work and don’t work for you and also leave having acquired some self-enhancement through the whole experience.

If you would like to boost your CV and become a volunteer tutor, let us know! GT Scholars runs an after-school tutoring programme that is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic aspirations. We aim to tackle educational inequality and improve social mobility by helping young people gain access to the most selective universities and the most competitive careers. Visit our website to find out how you can become a tutor today.