How Can Education Address The Social Mobility Dilemma?

How Can Education Address The Social Mobility Dilemma?

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According to the Social Mobility Commission’s State of The Nation Report 2018/19, social mobility in the UK has remained stagnant over the past four years, despite government interventions. This means that young people from low-income homes are less likely to access high-income careers and break the cycle of poverty.

Those from better-off backgrounds are almost 80% more likely to be in a professional job than their working-class peers. Due to this gap in access to professional jobs, people from working-class backgrounds earn 24% less a year. In addition, the report found that even when those from working-class backgrounds are successful in entering professional occupations, they earn on average 17% less than their more privileged colleagues.

These facts can be quite disheartening to young people and people who are working towards improving social mobility. However, it is important that we understand these issues so that we can develop strategies that are effective and sustainable. It may be a complicated issue, but we can start working on it if we make at least two significant changes – improving education and increasing the number of high-income jobs.

Education is key
It comes as no surprise that education has a profound effect on social mobility. The widening gap in attainment between young people from low-income backgrounds and their wealthier peers has far-reaching consequences. 

In fact, a 2019 report from the Education Policy Institute has found that the gap in GCSE attainment between disadvantaged pupils and non-disadvantaged pupils has stopped closing, which strongly correlates with current social mobility figures. This means that by the time they leave secondary school, disadvantaged pupils are now over 18.1 months behind non-disadvantaged pupils.

This huge gap means that young people from low-income backgrounds are not able to access university or other higher education routes, which means that they are shut out from accessing professional and high-income careers, which makes it increasingly difficult to break out of the cycle of poverty.

So how can we close this gap? Well, firstly we can help young people from low-income homes to access tutoring and mentoring programmes. Good tutors and mentors provide an invaluable resource to help young people to understand difficult topics, improve attainment, increase personal development skills, and develop strategies to reach career aspirations and goals. At the moment, young people from low-income homes simply cannot afford a good tutor or mentor. After school tutoring and mentoring programmes in state schools should be funded by the government so that these young people are provided with the same support as their peers from private schools.

State school funding should be increased to improve the opportunities and resources that they can provide to their pupils. This includes more funding for extracurricular activities and more funding for support staff. The University of Bath found that young people who participate in extracurricular activities are able to gain confidence and build up their social skills which is much sought after by employers. They are also more likely to aspire to go on to higher or further education. Unfortunately, the Social Mobility Commission reported huge disparities in children’s participation rates across a wide range of extra-curricular activities depending on their social background, with young people from wealthier families being much more likely to take part in every type of activity especially music and sport. This can be changed if state schools are able to provide access to a wide range of high-quality extracurricular activities.

With more funding, state schools will also be able to employ more support staff. This can help to reduce teacher workload which will increase the contact time between teachers and their pupils. An increase in contact time will give young people more time to understand difficult topics and increase the amount of individual attention given to them. Schools will also be able to employ full-time staff to support their pupils’ mental health and wellbeing needs. The Social Mobility Commission reported that young people from more disadvantaged areas are more likely to suffer from lower levels of wellbeing, which has far-reaching effects on their academic and personal development.

After secondary school, young people from low-income homes also need more support in accessing higher education routes such as colleges and universities. The Government has worked on increasing apprenticeships and will also introduce T-levels and other further education routes. However, according to the report from the Education Policy Institute, this has led to an over-representation of disadvantaged students in further education, which actually damages the government’s ambition of rectifying imbalances between further and higher education. Access to colleges and universities needs to be improved for young people from low-income homes so that they are able to attain the qualifications to allow them to access high-income and professional careers. 

This can be done through the introduction of a student premium to help college and university students from low-income homes, according to an article by London Metropolitan University. University access should also be further improved by increasing access to universities with higher prestige so that young people from low-income homes are able to compete fairly with their wealthier peers when looking for a job.

Increasing the number of high-income jobs
It’s all well and good to improve education and narrow the gap in attainment, but what will happen after school and university when even more young people need to compete for a job in a high-income career field. 

The good news is that over the last few decades, there has been a growth in the proportion of professional jobs and a corresponding decline in the proportion of working-class jobs, with the Social Mobility Commission reporting that nearly half of all current jobs are professional, while less than a third are working class. However, despite this growth, those from high-income backgrounds continue to get most of these top jobs, squeezing out those from the most disadvantaged backgrounds.

This means that there is still a fierce amount of competition for a high-income career, and if more young people are able to access university and higher education, then the competition will become even fiercer. So, it is imperative that the number of high-income and professional jobs is increased to meet the greater demand so that young people from low-income homes are able to access high-paying careers. It’s also important to increase the number of high-income jobs to allow their wealthier peers to still be able to access high-paying careers. If they are shut out of high-income jobs, it will cause downward mobility which further worsens the issue of social mobility in future generations.

The Government needs to invest in creating more professional jobs by increasing investment in growing industries such as digital and technology, increasing investment in small businesses and entrepreneurship, and attracting more investment by continually developing and strengthening the workforce.

By improving education and increasing the number of high-income jobs, more young people from low-income homes will be able to access high-paying careers, which will stimulate social mobility and break the cycle of poverty for future generations.  The issue may be complex, but it can be solved if the Government, the private sector, and non-profit organisations are able to work together and do their part.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – Exciting STEM opportunities!

In the Know – Exciting STEM opportunities!

In The Know Parents What's new?

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics offer fascinating learning experiences and rewarding career opportunities. In fact, STEM jobs are expected to grow at double the rate of other occupations creating 142,000 jobs between now and 2023, according to a report published by the Social Market Foundation and EDF. Here are three exciting opportunities for young people interested in learning more about STEM.

Routes into STEM
These innovative 3-day non-residential courses are focused on helping young people in Years 9 and 10 know more about the rewarding and challenging careers Maths and Science subjects can lead to. You will also get to engage with a college, a university and a company to compare routes into STEM careers and visualise your dream career and how to make it happen. Applications are currently open and there are bursaries available. Find out more here.

She Does Biomaths Competition
To celebrate the Year of Mathematical Biology, the University of Cambridge Newnham College and Lucy Cavendish College are inviting female GCSE students and to explore some of the intriguing connections between mathematics and the biological sciences. The competition is open to girls studying at a standard age UK state school who are starting Year 11 or Year 12 in September 2018, and there are two projects that they can choose from. Applications are open now and you can find out more here.

Inspire Courses
The Engineering Development Trust offers courses for young people in Year 11 who have a passion for STEM to be inspired at a leading UK university. During the course, you will be introduced to engineering or science through project work and workshops to give you a flavour of what to expect at university, and you will get to meet engineers, scientists, researchers and professionals. There are non-residential and residential options available, with bursaries also available. Applications are still open and you can find out more here.

GT Scholars offers after-school programmes that focus on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.

In the Know – Apprenticeships to accelerate your career!

In the Know – Apprenticeships to accelerate your career!

In The Know Parents What's new?

It’s the beginning of the final term of the year, but we know that most young people are already thinking about what to do after school. One option is to join an apprenticeship. An apprenticeship gives young people hands-on experience, a salary and the opportunity to get a degree in a relevant field. Here are three great apprenticeships for young people finishing their GCSEs or A-Levels this year.

IT Degree Apprenticeship
If your child is looking for an alternative, accelerated path into the IT industry, they should consider this 4 ½ year study and work programme from Capgemini. It includes all the opportunities you need to prepare for a successful career in the IT industry, acquiring technical skills in software engineering as well as broader business-related personal development, and you will receive a BSc (Honours) degree in Digital & Technology Solutions. The closing date for applications is the 8th of June 2018 for the intake in September. Find out more here.

PR & Communications Apprenticeship
This programme from the Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency provides an exciting apprentice opportunity for someone looking to develop a career and gain a qualification in communications. This role involves supporting the full range of PR activities, from project management and social media to writing news and digital content. GCSE students may also apply and the closing date is the 23rd of April 2018 for the intake in June. Find out more here.

Business Analyst Apprenticeship
Legal & General Investment Management Ltd is looking for someone with a desire to learn and contribute to become an apprentice Information Systems Business Analyst. You will receive full training, support and development throughout the 2-year program and gain formal qualifications alongside additional training in both the technology and the investment management domains. The closing date for applications is the 27th of May 2018 for the intake in September. Find out more here.

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.