In the Know – Explore your career options!

In the Know – Explore your career options!

In The Know What's new?

There are so many new career options emerging every year. However, young people are often not aware of the many pathways they can pursue after they are done with school. It is essential for them to assess their skills and find a career they are passionate about. This week we have three opportunities for young people to gain an insight into different careers.

GT Scholars Career Insight Programme
As part of the launch to the new GT Scholars Career Insight Programme which will begin in August, we will be offering young people a chance to attend a career workshop on Thursday 21st February at the EY offices in Canary Wharf. During this free workshop, young people aged 14-17 will have the chance to hear from professionals in a range of careers and understand the different paths that they took to achieve their career aspirations. To book your ticket, click here

Want a career in Aviation?
The Heathrow Jobs and Careers Fair 2019 will be taking place on Thursday 28th February. This free event will allow young people to meet with over 80 airport-based employers, educational institutions, volunteering organisations and apprenticeship programmes. They will be able to get the latest information about vacancies, placements and training available at the airport. To find out more, click here

Find your Opportunity!
The Festival of Opportunities will be running over the February half term. Suitable for young people aged 12-18, this series of events helps young people explore their potential, develop their skills and find out about great careers. Featured in this year’s festival are visits to Sky Media Studios and University of West London. To find out more, click here

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

7 Practical Tips For Online Tutoring

7 Practical Tips For Online Tutoring

Volunteers What's new?

In a world dominated by technology, online tutoring has become a convenient and reliable solution for young people seeking a tutoring programme. 

Although mostly similar to the classic method of in-person tutoring, there are a few differences that both the tutor and the student need to adapt to. This will ensure that they are able to reach their academic goals and get the most out of the tutoring programme.

Here are a few tips that tutors can use to make online tutoring work best:

  1. Set up the perfect learning environment
    Since the tutoring will be done online, most of the ‘human feel’ can be lost. However, this can be overcome by creating a more natural and relaxed environment for your student to feel welcome and not feel like they are alone in a room. Doing simple things such as asking the student to get a cup of tea or a glass of water can make them feel more at ease.
    You should also ensure that you have chosen a quiet and private place to do your tutoring so that you are not disturbed or bothered by loud noises. This helps you to remain focused and make the student feel like they are your first priority. Any distractions can cause your student to be unfocused, so you can also ask your student to put away their mobile phone so they are not tempted to check their messages or play games. Remember, young people will follow your lead so you should remove all distractions from your side as well.
  1. Be well organised
    To make sure that your time is used efficiently, ensure that you have structured the lesson well by making a lesson plan that is well organised. You should focus on reaching specific goals, while also allowing sufficient time for interaction and for the lesson to digress a little as you want it to feel more relaxed and not too rigid. However, if you find that the lesson is digressing too much, gently steer the conversation back to the problem at hand. You should also ensure that you have additional material in case you have a fast learner or if tutoring went by swiftly.
    On the technical side, ensure that your laptop or computer is fully charged and that there is no lag or delay with your internet connection. No one wants to be tutored if they have to keep waiting for the screen to stop buffering. If there is a technical glitch, ensure you have already established a back plan so that you and your student are aware of what to do should you be disconnected.
  1. Be easygoing and open while still maintaining professionalism
    The best way for a student to feel relaxed and at ease is to be open and easygoing, while still maintaining a level of professionalism. Finding the right balance can be hard, but with time, you’ll find it easier. You can use ice-breakers to make things lighter. You can also mix in a bit about your personal life in the conversation, but you don’t need to reveal too much about it. For example, it is fine to share some of your hobbies but it is not appropriate for you to share your dating plans. You should also keep conversations age-appropriate and avoid letting your personal problems from affecting your lesson as young people can sense when you are not in the right space of mind.
  1. Encourage discussion and interaction
    Always ensure that you set aside sufficient time for discussion and feedback. You can even allow for a few minutes of downtime by doing something that can allow them to refocus. It can be difficult to monitor their engagement during online tutoring so ensure that you make use of props, charts, or objects to help keep the student engaged. You can also find something that will allow you to connect with your student, such as music or making reference to movies or to a hobby that they may be interested in.
    You should also set realistic expectations, as each child has unique learning capabilities and will learn at their own pace. Do not rush through each lesson but rather be patient and remain focused. It will also be useful to develop an understanding of the kind of student you are tutoring. Some can be very direct and will give you a lot of feedback, while others can be more reserved and prefer that you do most of the talking.
  1. Set objectives and specific targets
    When planning your lesson, you should also set objectives and targets that you can use to measure your progress. Try to be slightly ahead of your targets so that if you fall behind a little, you will be able to easily catch up on your lessons. You should also ensure that you do not rush through your curriculum and that you adjust your lesson plan depending on the speed at which your student is learning. This means that your lesson plan has to be tailored to suit each student to ensure that you cover all sections of the subject that you are tutoring. You do not want to be rushing the last section if you did not plan correctly.
  1.  Prepare tests and quizzes
    The best way to measure your student’s progress and ensure if they have understood your tutoring is to set tests, quizzes, and assignments. Setting tests can help train the student to utilise their time well for their real exams. It can also help to specifically see where your student is excelling or falling behind. Tests can be scheduled ones so that your student can prepare for your test but it is also beneficial to set a spot test or two to ensure that your student is able to understand the work rather than just memorise it. Assignments help to allow the child to work independently and figure the work out on their own.
    Don’t set too long assignments or tests as this can deter them from doing the work since they already have homework from school. If they do fail the test, do not get upset or angry. Rather be supportive and encouraging as students thrive better in a positive environment. Use words like, “Let’s see where WE went wrong” or “Let’s see how WE can find another way to arrive at the correct answer.” Always be optimistic.
  1. Know your student and make tutoring fun
    Part of making online tutoring a success is to make sure you fully understand your student and what their needs are and how much can they retain before they become disengaged or uninterested. It is also important to keep tutoring fun so that the student is excited to learn and does not feel anxious or stressed for the tutoring session. Everyone retains much more when they are having a good time, so make sure to keep sessions exciting.

With these tips, you should be able to make your online tutoring sessions productive, impactful and useful so that your student can reach their academic goals.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – Ace your exams!

In the Know – Ace your exams!

In The Know Parents What's new?

It’s that time of year when young people start worrying about their upcoming exams. However, studying for exams does not have to strike fear into their minds! This week we bring you three great ways that will help to get their brains into gear for exams!

Ready, Set, Go: Acing Your Exams!
GT Scholars will be hosting our popular Ready, Set, Go: Acing Your Exams! workshop that aims to help young people conquer their exams. This free workshop is suitable for young people aged 12-16 and helps them by improving study skills, time management, and mindset techniques. It also helps young people navigate the stress and demands of exams. To book your ticket, click here.

Gojimo
Have you heard of Gojimo? It’s a free app that helps young people aged 13-18 with their homework and exam revision. Not only do young people gain access to quizzes, practice questions and study tips, but they can also learn about future careers, universities, apprenticeships and so much more! To find out more about Gojimo and the subjects covered, click here.

Seneca Learning
Seneca Learning is an online platform which encourages young people to study by using humour in the form of GIFs and memes. The site’s algorithm works to identify questions that young people struggle with and uses alternative formats that help them to better understand and answer correctly. Young people can join a class or revise on their own. To find out more, click here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

7 Reasons Why State School Pupils are Still Not Getting into High-Income Careers

7 Reasons Why State School Pupils are Still Not Getting into High-Income Careers

What's new?

There is still an increasing trend of educational inequality that affects young talent attempting to enter into the job market. A recent study from the Social Mobility Commission concluded that young people from more advantaged socio-economic backgrounds, including those who’ve attended private school, are more likely to be in top jobs. 

What is the root cause of the increase in this trend and what can society do to prevent us from slipping back into an age of educational oppression?  

Here are a few reasons as to why privately-educated pupils are getting the benefit of the doubt when going head to head with a state-schooled pupil:

  1. Untimely graduation – Few state school pupils who make it to college complete their studies on time. Pupils from low-income backgrounds may have access to grants for tuition, but they still have to make provision for living expenses. Many pupils cannot afford to study and work part-time and they end up being forced to seek full-time employment. Of course, there is the argument that working and learning at the same time can result in better education and stronger career prospects and future options, especially when working in jobs related to subjects studied, however, working too much can reduce completion rates for low-income and first-generation college pupils. A spokesperson for The National Union of Teachers said their report “gives a sombre warning to Government that unless investment and the correct interventions are in place, the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers will continue”.
  2. Career threshold – Most employers have strict recruitment procedures that ensure all aspects of a new job application is covered. When considering job applications from new candidates, they look at educational background including the school attended, academic attainment and the university attended. What they fail to realise is the fact that ticking these boxes is not an accurate prediction of the applicant’s strength. A more adept way to interview would be to focus on non-academic factors such as articulacy, assertiveness and other important soft skills. Employers that access a wider pool of diverse talent will provide real benefits for employees and the business alike.
  3. Not enough equivalent experience – When employers refer to equivalent experience in a job posting, they could be referring to experience as a substitute for not having the educational requirements or they could be referring to unpaid experience, such as volunteer work or an internship. Most state pupils are obviously not able to meet this requirement due to time or financial constraints that prevent them from taking on volunteer work or unpaid internships.
  4. Incorrect business destination and intent – Many employers have the incorrect focal point when it comes to success. Their considerations lean more towards prioritisation of tasks and general commerce when they should rather be paying more attention to what individuals can attribute to their overall financial growth. Employers should be looking to employ people who are going to complement the community that they are trying to build. The graduates who clearly articulate their interests, goals and aspirations are often overlooked because of their lower percentage performance in university or due to a lack of educational prestige.
  5. Restricted personal development –  Young people from advantaged backgrounds are more likely to be extroverts and have substantially higher economic aspirations since private schools have the resources to work on personal development. On the other hand, state schools don’t focus on personal development enough, and their pupils are not able to develop self-confidence or high career aspirations.
  6. Budget deficits – With the entire world moving into a technology-based environment, it is becoming clear that tech-savvy thinking is one of the things that employers are looking for. Unfortunately, state schools are lacking behind in this area, especially when it comes to the use of tech devices in class. Pupils cannot afford their own devices and unless there is some sort of independent funding along the way, the schools are also not able to provide this for all pupils.  This suppresses the learning potential of the pupils and they will not be able to develop the necessary skills to keep up with the changing working world.
  7. Educator challenges –  State schools employ a disproportionate share of teachers, relative to the number of pupils they educate, with class sizes being far too high for one teacher to handle. This creates many challenges for individual educators such as learner performance and disciplinary problems. Learner performance is affected there is less time for the educator to give individual attention. Learners attention is also affected as classrooms tend to be more noisy and disruptive during lessons. Furthermore, the educator’s time management is affected as they do not have the time to attend to test papers and assignments with as much detail, so they often overlook vital areas where improvement may be needed.

Even though pupils are facing these challenges based on inequality and the lack of adaptability by many employers, they should not be discouraged.  Young people entering the job market should assess what they can offer and why they can be an asset to their potential employer. They should include their best qualities in a personal cover letter when applying and focus on their unique credentials and skills.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – Innovation, Imagination and Fun!

In the Know – Innovation, Imagination and Fun!

In The Know Parents What's new?

Learning nowadays can be so much fun for young people! They are able to navigate through complex subjects and problems, all whilst enjoying the experience of innovation and teamwork. This week we bring you three skill-building activities for young people to enjoy!

Code Green!
As part of the Winter Lights Festival at Canary Wharf, young people can put their coding skills to the test by participating in Code Green. They will take on the challenge of turning the world green by making environmental decisions in a collaborative coding game. This free, drop-in event will be on Saturday 26th January between 10am-10pm. To find out more, click here.

Master the Masterclass!
For the first time, Tate Modern will be giving the public free access to their Saturday Masterclass. Led by Scale Rule, young people will get the chance to learn about artworks relating to graphic design, architecture and engineering. Thereafter they will work together to create their own masterpieces! The classes will be held on both Saturday 26th January and Saturday 2nd February from 12pm to 6pm. To find out more, click here.

Skill building Saturdays!
Did you know that Wellcome Collection runs free monthly workshops for young people aged 14-19? Their Saturday Studio events give young people a chance to learn about animation, photography and digital journalism in a practical setting. These studios are led by creative experts and help young people use their creativity and imagination to develop new skills. To find out more, click here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – Create and collaborate!

In the Know – Create and collaborate!

In The Know Parents What's new?

Did you know that LinkedIn has identified creativity and collaboration as two of the most sought-after soft skills by companies? Young people can benefit from learning these skills from a young age, so this week we bring you three activities which are centred around creativity, collaboration and careers!

Get Creative!
The Design Museum runs the Young Creatives programme for young people aged 14-19 years old. They have monthly meetings where young people work together as a team on design-based projects. They will get to take part in 2D and 3D design, join in workshops with designers and members of the museum team, and gain career insights. To find out more about how you can join, click here.

Learn about Careers!
Kidzania’s career fair will be taking place on Wednesday 23rd January and Thursday 24th January. Young people aged between 10 and 14 can participate in a series of workshops which encourage them to work as a team and develop their communication and problem-solving skills. They get to do all this whilst learning about different careers! Find out more here.

Vlog like a pro!
Young people have the chance to participate in MediaTrust’s Vlogging training on Monday 28th January. This free workshop, taking place at Google Academy London, is suitable for young people aged 16 and above. Lessons for the day include video editing, presentation skills and confidence building. Book your tickets here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – New Year, New Hobbies!

In the Know – New Year, New Hobbies!

In The Know Parents What's new?

Happy New Year! A new year is a great time to start taking up new hobbies or exploring new interests. You never know where they may lead, it just might be the first step to something bigger! This week we bring you three activities for young people to enjoy.

Be an Entrepreneur!
Ultra education provides weekly entrepreneur clubs at The Granville for young people aged 7-18 years old. This free event teaches young people entrepreneurship whilst building their confidence, communication skills and financial literacy. It’s an excellent step for young people to learn about how to do what they love and get paid for it. To find out more, click here.

For the Science Fans
The EasyCodingClub has a fun Lego Robotics Coding and STEM workshop every week at various locations around London. This free workshop is suitable for young people aged 6-12 years old and is designed to nurture young minds to develop an interest in coding and building robots. They will be able to learn key science and engineering practices and apply maths in a fun engaging way. To find out more, click here.

Be Creative with Manga
The V&A is hosting a Create! Manga workshop for 13-15-year olds on Saturday 26th January. Young people will be able to gather inspiration from the V&A’s Japan gallery and get to create their very own Manga characters. Tickets to this workshop cost £20 and you will need to book in advance to secure a place. To find out more, click here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

In the Know – Upcoming scholarship opportunities!

In the Know – Upcoming scholarship opportunities!

In The Know Parents What's new?

University can be quite expensive, but there are many different ways young people can access funding for tuition, accommodation or books. One such way is through a scholarship programme. Here are three scholarship opportunities that are currently open for young people looking to join an undergraduate engineering programme at a university.

The Kingsbury Scholarship
The Kingsbury Scholarship is a highly prestigious engineering scholarship aimed at bright and dynamic students who intend to study at Imperial College London. With a total value of £20,000 per year for up to 4 years, eligible candidates must also agree to take part in one or more internships or work placements in a UK engineering industry, either before their start at Imperial, as part of their course, or in two or more summer breaks. Online applications must be submitted no later than 5pm on Thursday, 1st June 2018. Find out more here.

Chris Seymour Bursary
The Chris Seymour Bursary aims to support one UK female student in financial need who wants to study electronic or electrical engineering at University College London. The award will be £10,416 per year, based on a three-year programme and is subject to satisfactory academic progress. Applicants must hold an offer of admission to UCL to study a full-time undergraduate degree within the UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences. The deadline for the application is Friday, 6th July 2018 at 5pm. Find out more here.

IGEM Undergraduate Scholarship
The Institute of Gas Engineers & Managers Undergraduate Scholarship is open to students who currently hold a conditional or unconditional offer for an undergraduate Engineering Council accredited course at any university in the UK. Successful students will receive up to £9,000 for full-time study. Renewal of the funding after the first year is conditional on satisfactory progress being made. Applications must be submitted by Saturday, 30th June 2018. Find out more here.

GT Scholars offers after-school programmes that focus on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.

In the Know – Explore the world of journalism and media!

In the Know – Explore the world of journalism and media!

In The Know Parents What's new?

A career in journalism is a rewarding and exhilarating experience. You get to explore what is happening in your community, city or around the world, and you get to investigate interesting stories and events. Once you find your story, you then use your writing skills to report on these current happenings for the greater good. Here are a few opportunities for young people who want to explore a career in this industry.

The Young Journalists’ Academy
The Young Journalists’ Academy is a unique week-long programme aimed at inspiring and training the newsmakers of tomorrow. In partnership with some of the world’s leading media organisations, the YJA gives aspiring journalists the skills and the contacts they need to kick-start their careers in the media. The academy takes place in the summer where young people will focus on honing their skills as a journalist and take a step into the world of publishing. Applications are now open for 2018 and you can find out more here.

Transforming Hidden Talent Programme
Media Trust’s Transforming Hidden Talent programme creates amazing opportunities for young people in London who are interested in the media and creative industries. By connecting 16-25 year olds with top organisations, the programme gives an inside view of what it’s like working in the media industry. Each young person is also matched with an experienced professional working in the creative or media industry for one-to-one personalised career support. Find out more here.

BBC iReporter
The new interactive BBC iReporter game gives young people aged 11 to 18 the chance to take on the role of a journalist in the BBC newsroom. It is a “choose your own adventure” game, created by Aardman Animations, which challenges you to make your own decisions on which sources, political claims, social media comments and pictures should be trusted as you contribute to the day’s news output. Find out more here.

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.

Meet one of our Volunteer Mentors – Sophie Germain

Meet one of our Volunteer Mentors – Sophie Germain

Private tuition Private tutors Volunteers What's new?

Who are the volunteer mentors of GT Scholars? Every once in a while we conduct an interview with one of our amazing volunteers so we can introduce them to you and share the good work they have been doing. Our volunteers form a crucial part of GT Scholars and their charitable deeds never goes unnoticed. We spoke to the lovely Sophie Germain to find out her views on social mobility and what she enjoys most about volunteering with GT Scholars.

Could you tell us about what led you to volunteering as a mentor with GT Scholars??
I try to explore a different area each year and I felt that volunteering with teenagers is one of the demographics I have not worked with before. I wanted to do something that was accessible to a lot of people and that was not limited to only a certain area you live in, the school you go to etc.

What are some of your opinions about social mobility?
In London, a perceived good area and a not so good area can be found in a commutable distance from one another. There are a lot of things to see and do and a lot is available for free. Perhaps in smaller towns, this mix is harder to find. Also once you’ve passed the stage of institutional education and you’ve started your career you are less likely to be type-casted based on where you went to school and it’s more about your experience. I went to a state school and some of my friends were in private schools but both groups have ended up in equivalent positions. Sometimes if you have a plan and you are dedicated to it, it is easier to achieve a particular goal if you have access to the correct information and the right people around you. However, there are certain historical and cultural issues that are still at play today that puts up barriers for some people. For example, an issue like the gender pay gap review due to male dominated boardrooms and industries. Balancing this will take a long time and to do it in a way that is fairer.

How did you come to this conclusion?
London has quite a high diversity level and when I was growing up it was common for children to socialise with other children who have a very different background to their own. In regards to gender, changes in attitude need to come from men and women. Including better grounds for the way children are raised and not pigeonholing them based on aspects such as gender. It also requires being open-minded in recruiting positions to not focus on gender, race, economic background, social circles etc.

What would you tell someone who is considering volunteering with GT Scholars?
It is a well-operated volunteer programme so I would recommend people to get involved. You get the chance to share new ideas and methods of learning with a young person who can benefit from it. It is nice to hear the dreams of a young person and help them to access the tools that they need to achieve them.

What do you enjoy the most about being a volunteer at GT Scholars? Well, it is early days for me because I have only done two terms so far. I would like to get more involved in the open days. But I would say that I enjoyed giving my mentees a positive outlook on what can be achieved. For some people, teenage years can be quite difficult to go through. I tell my mentees about the different perspective of other people and prepare them to have the skills to deal with other people’s opinions and encourage them to be focused.

What is your message or advice to young people of today?

I would suggest that they try as many new things as they can whilst they are young. This helps to build up experience, meet different people and get familiar with what they like and dislike. I would also advise not to become overburdened with things and take the time to learn what brings them inner peace, as I think it is an important part of getting to know oneself. Don’t be overly judgemental and learn how to maintain a healthy balanced lifestyle.

As a Kingston University graduate, I can apply the skills that I’ve learned and I can also share the passion of what the core company is. I study philosophy in my spare time and enjoy staying fit.

Sophie enjoys her professional career as it falls in her line of interest and previous studies. She works for AEG Europe as an analyst in the live sports and music industry. Her company offers a Giving Back Day to employees for volunteering.

GT Scholars is a social enterprise that provides tutoring, mentoring and enrichment to young people from a range of backgrounds. To find out more about our volunteering opportunities, please get in touch with us.