We need private tutors to teach children that failure is a part of learning

We need private tutors to teach children that failure is a part of learning

Growth mindset What's new?

Firstly, let’s understand this: to learn we must fail. Yes, that’s right. Failure provides us with opportunities to learn and an opportunity to reflect. Like Thomas Edison once said: “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that it won’t work.” Every attempt is a lesson to learn.

Many of us are constantly held back by the fear of failure. But how do we ensure that our children adapt the mindset of, “you won’t succeed unless you try’’? How do we ensure that they experience true freedom through embracing failure?

First and foremost you need to show empathy. We need to empathise with our child when we see that they are in distress. If you only say things like “It is okay, you will do better next time”, it can make your child feel as if their feelings of frustration and disappointment are being brushed off. This can escalate the feeling of distress they are already feeling. Rather try and level with your child. Try saying “I can see that you are really disappointed by this and I know you are really hoping to do better.”

Explain to them that failure is inevitable and happens to everyone. Tell your child about a time when you failed and how you dealt with it but most importantly remember to tell them what you learned from your failure and how you came out better on the other side of it. Make your child understand that things do not always go according to plan and if they don’t, that it is 100% okay.

See your child’s failures as an opportunity to teach acceptance and an opportunity to develop their problem solving skills. It is a great idea to spend time with your child and try to come up with an action plan together on what to do to have a better chance at success next time around. Try exploring areas such as different teaching techniques or perhaps entertaining the idea of making use of a tutor. According to Dr Mintzer, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute, it is a balance of acceptance and change and about accepting that the situation is what it is and building frustration tolerance while at the same time asking if you can change something in the future or how to learn from it.

Children need to be taught that when we do fail, we cannot do much about it in the heat of the moment, sometimes we need to accept the outcome and move on. Many of us are constantly held back by the fear of failure. The unseen hazards of social media are often overlooked, for example, if a girl’s friend tells her that she will not be able to go to the movies with her tomorrow night but afterwards she sees her friend posting a picture with someone else at the movies on Instagram, her feelings will be hurt.  These instances are where we need to teach our child that calling the friend and screaming at them because she is angry and feels she failed at a friendship will make matters worse. We need to teach them that there is an option to ignore the situation and not engage in confrontation. This might not make her feel better and this is where you as a parent need to give guidance and empathy to help your child deal with the disappointment.

Our children should learn not to have a too high regard for others opinions. We are too scared about what teachers, tutors, parents and friends would think about us if we fail.  We are too concerned about what society will say if things don’t go as planned. Worrying about other people’s opinions will prevent you from reaching your goals and dreams. Teach your child that in life, one sometimes will get into a situation where you might have to make an unpopular decision to achieve success. If you are constantly worried what other people think it will prevent you from making the right decision

Be an example to your child by striving to constantly grow and move forward. Should we fail, we have to look at it as a lesson to learn, adjust the route, adapt to changes and try again, but now with better knowledge. If appropriate, discuss your failure with your child and share your story on how you dealt with it. We have all heard the stories of failure, Einstein was classified by his teachers as “mentally slow” and Walt Disney was fired from one of his first jobs due to “lack of creativity”. Don’t be afraid to fail, dare to take risks, fail again, try again and reach your full potential.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise that provides a range of courses and workshops. Our growth mindset course focuses on helping young people and parents have a full understanding of growth mindset and how to apply this in their everyday lives. Find out more about our courses and workshops here.

7 Traits of parents with successful children

7 Traits of parents with successful children

Growth mindset Parents What's new?

There is no set manual to follow when it comes to raising successful children but psychological research has narrowed down a few factors that will most likely result in success. It comes as no surprise that a majority of the responsibility lies with the parents. Although, it is not entirely up to the parents, there are a few things parents with successful children have in common. Let’s look at 7 traits of parents with successful children.

Make them do Chores: Making children do chores from a young age will teach your child that hard work pays off. Most importantly, chores also imprint a sense of responsibility on a child.  Always ensure the chores are age appropriate and that they do receive some type of praise or remuneration for it. Chores can range from picking up toys and putting it back inside the box, washing dishes, mowing the lawn or walking the dog.

Give them pocket money: Give children pocket money, whether it is in a form of payment for chores they have completed or an allowance they get on a weekly or monthly basis. It will teach them the value of money and also how to work with their money.  It is important, however, not to give them more money when they run out of their own. This will defeat the purpose. They also need to learn the importance of saving, even if it is saving for a fancy bicycle or a new gaming centre they would like to have. You can sit down with them and work out a weekly budget, teaching them how to set out money for spending and money for saving.

Teach them to not be afraid of failure: “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work and learning from failure” – Colin Powell. You want your kids to develop a growth mindset. You want them to view failure, which is inevitable, as a chance to learn and grow – not as a dead end. They need to learn to keep at it and not give up on the first try.

Let them learn to be tolerant:  Being tolerant to different types of people with different personalities is a very important trait to have. It is just wrong if a person looks down on another. Your child should learn to be the Good Samaritan. This will result in great respect from their peers. In addition, children should also learn the principle of putting themselves in other people’s shoes first before judging. That way they can understand why certain things happen and how to deal with these situations when they arise. For example, you can introduce this by explaining why a school bully might be acting out in a certain way.

Encourage entrepreneurship:  Based on research by Bill Murphy Jr., a renowned entrepreneur, the majority of today’s entrepreneurs were encouraged to act like entrepreneurs at an early age. These included personally observing an entrepreneur while growing up and being constantly challenged by their parents to come up with ways that they think they can make money. You can help your child by setting up a lemonade stand in the front yard to sell to the neighbourhood and taking part in school market days.

Praise them for hard work:  The way we praise our children has an effect on how they view their success. When they earn a high score on a math test or win a sports trophy, it is important to praise them for their hard work and perseverance, not just telling them that their success was a direct result of them being smart or talented. Although we want to compliment our children, we also want them to know that although they have a natural talent, hard work is always required and that it always pays off. This will nurture a growth mindset.  If we do not praise them in this way, their confidence can suffer a knock when they try and don’t succeed at first.

Remember to be their role model:  From the day they are born our children look up to us as their parents. We are the first example of trust, love, empathy and respect they will have in this world. How we deal with failure and how we celebrate success is constantly being observed by our children.  You need to set examples of the type of person you would like your child to be. The “do as I say, not as I do” method is not one that often succeeds. You want your child to trust you and strive to be like you, not to obey you out of fear of being punished for not following the rules. It is likely that the moment you are not around, they might just do the exact opposite of what they were told.  They need to want to follow the rules. They need to want to succeed because you succeeded.

Raising a successful child is a conversation that many of us parents have engaged in before and one that can carry on for an infinite amount of time. We hope you found this topic insightful.

GT Scholars strives in providing mentoring, tutoring and enrichment to children from diverse backgrounds. Feel free to contact us to find out how GT scholars can help your child reach even higher heights.

In the Know – Prepare for Take Off!

In the Know – Prepare for Take Off!

In The Know Parents What's new?

A career in aviation offers many exciting opportunities for advancement in piloting, engineering as well as aircraft manufacturing, maintenance and airport operations. Possible career opportunities range from working in commercial airlines, private manufacturing companies, airports, and government organizations. Here are some interesting events you can attend that will serve as a great introduction to what a career in aviation will be like.

The Royal Air Force Museum – Local History Walking Tours
On the 15th of October 2017, join the Royal Air Force Museum on a fascinating walking tour of their local area and discover the history of aviation in Hendon from the arrival of Claude Grahame-White’s Flying School and Aerodrome through to the opening of the Museum and the recent development of the local area. Each tour lasts an hour. Find out about this interesting free event here.

National Work Experience Week – British Airways Career Fair
British Airways are delighted to invite students to British Airways’ Head Office as part of National Work Experience Week. This is a perfect opportunity for you to find out more about careers in aviation first hand, from our apprenticeship team, cabin crew, customer service representatives and pilots. Have a look here to find out more about this awesome free event that takes place on the 17th of October.

Open Evening at Heathrow Aviation Engineering UTC
On the 18th of October, Heathrow Aviation Engineering is hosting an open evening which gives aviation enthusiasts the chance to tour their state-of-the-art facilities, talk to their staff and students and meet some of their industry partners. There will also be a talk from Wayne Edwards (UTC Principal) at 6.30pm. This event is great for both parents and students and it is free, but tickets need to be booked in advance if you want to attend. For more information about this event, have a look here.

The GT Scholars programme is committed to the providing useful information about careers. Look out for more details on our upcoming workshops on our website and social media pages. You can also contact us or give us a call on 02088168066 to find out more about our brilliant mentoring programme.

10 Websites young people can use to learn anything online

10 Websites young people can use to learn anything online

What's new? Young people

Knowledge is power! Learning new things can change your life for the better. It will give your self-esteem a boost and it will also affect the way you do things on a day to day basis. On top of that, you will experience personal growth.

Being in a constant flow of learning new things ensures that we are current and up to date with our ever-changing, fast-paced environment. It makes us open to new, exciting opportunities and will kick start a personal growth journey filled with endless possibilities. As long as we can learn, the sky’s the limit! If we do not learn new things we stagnate and eventually we will start moving backwards.

Because there is absolutely nothing to lose, except your comfort zone, there should be no reason why you should not visit one of these awesome websites to embark on your new journey!

  1.  CodeAcademy  – The demand for people who have coding skills are on the rise. This is not only true for developers, programming is on the way of playing bigger roles in everyday career paths. With coding added to your list of skills, you can definitely pursue a more rewarding career. Codecademy offers free coding classes covering 12 different programming languages, which include, Python, Java, PHP, JavaScript, Ruby, SQL, and Sass, to name a few.
  2. PhotographyCourse.net – A picture is worth a thousand words. It will be worth your while to have photography added to your skills list. It is a powerful tool which allows us to share and to communicate to those around us.  This website offers free online photography courses. You can enrol in comprehensive photography lessons that cover various topics, such as Photographic Lenses, How to Use Your Camera, Light and the Photographer, and Digital Cameras.

  3. Adobe Photoshop CC – The Complete Beginners Guide – Photo editing is just as important as the actual photo shoot.  Editing defines the mood of the photograph and enhances the overall message that a photo is supposed to deliver. Up your skills with this free course by Adobe Know How. Having photo editing skills can open many doors.

  4. Channel 9 Web Development – If you are interested in a career in web design, go check out  Channel 9 Web Development. This website offers a course for beginners wanting to learn web design.  The course is presented online in a series of 21 videos of 30 minutes long in length. You will only be able to move on to the next lesson if you can master the basics of the lesson before.  At the end of the course, you should be able to create a very good website.

  5. Yousician –  Yousician is an interactive music service that allows you to learn and play a musical instrument.  The website supports the guitar, piano, ukulele and bass.  The site offers easy step by step tutorials and proves exercises based on your performance level.  Starting a band has never been easier.

  6. Developing Android Apps Android Fundamentals – Google and Udacity have teamed up to launch a free crash course in Android development. This course covers theory as well as practice to teach you how to build great apps in a jiffy. The course has step-by-step instructions to teach you how to build a cloud-connected Android app. You will also learn the best practices of mobile development, mainly focussing on Android development.

  7. DuDuolingo – Knowing an additional language can open a world of job opportunities and at the same time establish meaningful connections and be the start of possible cross-cultural friendships. Whether you want to learn a new language from scratch or just want to brush up on your French skills, this site is ideal.

  8. Blender – Animation is everywhere, whether it is in a movie, a TV commercial or business presentation. It will be definitely worth your while to master this skill. Blender is a 3D animation software that can be used to create amazing 3D images and animate them. The best of all is that the software is free and so are the courses. So if you are interested in a career in animation, be sure to check out this site.

  9. Alison.com’s Sketchup course – Do you want to become the next most sought after architect? Get a headstart with yet another awesome program that is completely free to download. The good news is that some architect firms actually recognises Sketchup as a valid 2D plan drawing tool. A free course, plus a free software! Isn’t that cool?

  10. Music Technology Foundations by EDX – All features and materials may not be available as this is the free version of the course. EdX keeps courses open for enrollment after the end to allow learners to explore content and continue learning. The course offers history, theory and practice of music technology, Sound, audio, MIDI, effects and sequencing. It also entails hands-on practice with music-making using contemporary digital tools

So, what are you waiting for? Information has never been this easily accessible We need to grasp every opportunity to learn with both hands. The world (or should I say web) is definitely your oyster!  There are numerous free and low-cost websites and apps available on the Internet.  The list above is only but to name a few. It is also worth to mention that Youtube also offers thousands of video tutorials on a wide variety of topics.  To find out about more great opportunities and events for young people, feel free to sign up to our newsletter.

The GT Scholars programme wants to help young people aged 11-16 to achieve excellent grades and reach their future goals. If you’re interested, you’ll need to register your interest or give us a call on 020 881 68066.

 

12 Things You Can Do to Breathe More Life into Your CV or Personal Statement

12 Things You Can Do to Breathe More Life into Your CV or Personal Statement

University What's new? Young people

The saying goes: “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That is why a great CV or personal statement is extremely important. It is a representation of who you are and will be responsible for the initial decision of whether a potential interview is on the horizon or not.

An employer often has to search through hundreds of CVs to find the best candidate for the post that needs to be filled. Often an employer is pressed for time, so a CV that does not impress at first glance could be easily rejected.

This can make creating a CV to be a daunting task. Applicants usually find themselves endlessly pondering over questions such as “How could I make my CV or personal statement stand out from the crowd?” or “How could I prevent my CV being overlooked and not be added to the pile of unsuccessful applications?’’

To answer some of these questions, here are 12 things that you can do to breathe more life into your CV or personal statement:

  1. Make it readable and pay attention to the layout: First and foremost, you want to make your CV readable. This will make it easy for your potential employer or the dean of admissions to find information and navigate to different sections of your CV.  Information provided must be to the point and quick to read.
  2. Make use of a professional resource: GT Scholars is an excellent example of an organisation assisting young scholars through mentorships and workshops. Great guidance for putting a good CV together is essential if you are not too sure of what to do. You could also gain great experience that will be really useful when entering the professional world.
  3. Adapt your CV to the role: Try and stray from a generic CV. This does not mean that you have to write a new CV for every position you want to apply for. Simply adapt a few details on your CV to be more prominent to a specific recruiter. This applies even more to a personal statement as you want to make sure that the qualities that are most suitable stand out.
  4. The importance of the first 3 words: In writing, it is believed that the first three words and the last three words in a written piece are what people remember most. It makes sense to apply the same principle when writing bullet points in your CV because employers do not read the whole document word for word.
  5. Pay attention to buzzwords: Try to avoid words that have been overused. These words have lost their charm and most of the time it will have lost its meaning to the recruiter as they most probably read many CVs and personal statements that have the same word choice. Check out this post on LinkedIn for the buzzwords to avoid in 2017.
  6. Let who you are shine through: Your personal statement should reflect clues about your personality. More often than not an employer will interview a potential candidate because he might have read something that interested him other than your professional achievements and experience. This can be anything from a sport, a book, or a volunteer activity that could be of mutual interest.
  7. Be aware of the CV length: There is an unspoken rule that a CV should never exceed 2-3 pages. Try to keep your CV short, but also not too short. Having a CV with 4 or more pages can result in important information not being read.
  8. Pay attention to font and size: Always pay attention to the font and size of your CV and personal statement. Ensure that it has the same font and size throughout the document. Never make your font size below 10 points. Use bold, italics and underline words but be careful not to go overboard with this.
  9. Good presentation goes a long way: There is more to presentation than having the perfect layout, length and font size. A dash of colour or a well-placed border can make your CV stand out from the rest and might be as good as a breath of fresh air, giving the recruiter something appealing to look at for a change.
  10. Name your file: Rename your CV file for each position you apply for via email or online. You can rename the file using your name and job title followed by ‘CV’. It will draw the attention of the recruiter and he/she will be able to find your job application easier.
  11. Trim the excess: Do not waste time and space on listing every achievement or position you have ever had. The recruiter will only be interested in reading information relevant to the position that needs to be filled.
  12. Keywords are very important: It should come as no surprise that in today’s day and age your CV might be read by a software programme before it is even submitted to a human. These programs are designed to look for words and phrases that relate to the job specifications or to the relevant industry. Ensure you do the necessary research and add keywords to your personal statement or CV.

You might feel that landing an interview will take forever, but by making use of these steps, you can definitely improve your chances. We hope that you find these tips helpful and that it will boost your confidence when sending your CV.

GT Scholars can provide you with an experienced mentor to help you start the journey of writing your CV and personal statement as well as applying for a new job or university acceptance.  To find out what other opportunities and events we host for young people, feel free to contact us.

In the Know – Become a filmmaker this October!

In the Know – Become a filmmaker this October!

In The Know Parents What's new?

This October sees the annual BFI Film Festival, undoubtedly UK’s biggest celebrations of international cinema. Among the many festival events that are happening, we want to tell you about great opportunities for your child if they want to learn more about and get involved in the field of film-making and cinema.

Bell House Movie Workshop
This October half-term, the Bell House centre in Dulwich is hosting an exciting Halloween movie-making course. The course includes learning how to create fun and unique production designs, learn some special and technical effects, as well as practise directing, acting and camera skills. The course runs from Monday the 23rd of October to Wednesday the 25th. They are providing 4 free places to pupils on Free School Meals! If you are interested in enrolling your child, contact us as soon as possible so you don’t miss out.

BFI Film Academy
If you are between the ages of 16 and 19 and you are passionate about film and a career in the film industry, then the BFI Film Academy is for you! Hosted in London by the Mouth That Roars Studio, the programme is free for successful applicants. In the academy, you will explore your own creativity and passions in a supportive and dynamic environment, while also gaining valuable experience working alongside industry professionals who are respected practitioners in their field. Deadline for applications is the 17th of November, and you can find out more and how to apply here.

Into Film Clubs
Into Film Clubs are a fun and valuable way to engage young people with and through film. The club provides opportunities to watch and discuss films, to understand how films are made, and to learn how to make your own film. The club also has a significant and positive impact on young people’s learning, in particular with regard to literacy, communication and social skills. The clubs are free for all state-funded schools or non-profits and are easy to set up or join. There is also an Into Film Festival coming up in November from the 8th to the 24th and bookings have already opened. Find out more here.

The GT Scholars programme is committed to the development of practical skills such as film-making. Look out for more details on our upcoming workshops on our website and social media pages. You can also contact us or give us a call on 02088168066 to find out more. If you want to stay up to date on events and opportunities for your child, sign up to our weekly newsletter. 

Meet one of our volunteer mentors – Jason

Meet one of our volunteer mentors – Jason

Volunteer interviews Volunteer roles Volunteers What's new? Young people

Our volunteers are amazing people that are passionate about making a difference in education. We would like you to get to know who they are and what they do at GT Scholars, so every few weeks we conduct an interview with one of them. Here is the most recent interview with one of our volunteer mentors, Jason Luu.

Why did you decide to volunteer with GT Scholars?
I decided to volunteer with GT Scholars to make a difference in my local community. Having already done some work to help other communities in different countries, I came to the realisation that I should also be contributing to my local community. I also recognised that providing support to people when they are still young can make a significant difference, as this is something that I was not fortunate enough to have when I was younger. If I had the opportunity to be mentored when I was a teenager, I can only imagine how much more I could have achieved by now or how many disasters I could have avoided.

Tell me a little bit about you and what got you to where you are today?
I was born in London, my parents were refugees from another country. This had a huge impact on me and my upbringing. When I was younger, I was embarrassed by my heritage because it was so foreign to western culture. But as I got older and matured, I embraced my background and decided to stand up and stand out rather than follow the crowd. I more took control of my life and did not live according to other people’s expectations. This has become a big factor in getting me to where I am today. It turns out that my own expectations for myself were wildly beyond other people’s expectations of me.

I also have role models who I can look up to and inspire me. Some of them are alive today and some are historical figures. Having these role models allow me to draw energy, ideas and behaviours from. If anyone reading this doesn’t have a role model, then you better start looking.

Why do you think mentoring is valuable to young people?
Traditionally, mentoring is something that has been reserved for older, professional and sometimes even wealthy people. Many of the most powerful leaders in our society have or had mentors. So why can’t the rest of us have access to this resource?

Many young people today from my local community have parents who are very busy working or studying, and their friends are usually in the same boat as them. Thus, having a mentor who has the right experience would really help with some of the things that they struggle with, and would help to develop smarter behaviours and habits. This additional guidance and development can really help a young person to be successful in all that they do. I really believe that if I had a mentor when I was younger, I would not have had to experience so many difficulties in my life. I would have been able to get where I am today sooner or even be more successful sooner. It is the aim of all good mentors is to guide their mentee to reach their full potential.

What part of the volunteering process have you found the most fulfilling?
Seeing students and their parents working together, and it provides extra support to traditional parenting.

What do you think is the most important skill to have as a volunteer mentor?
I think showing a genuine interest in someone else’s future and actually caring about their happiness is an important skill. It is not just about making sure that they are successful, but also about helping to define what true happiness means to them and their family.

Jason briefly attended university before deciding to drop out and start his professional life earlier. He now works in the headquarters of the Department of Health, holding CEOs, directors and major leaders in healthcare and education accountable to the taxpayer as a Senior Contract Manager. He has spent the last 3 years dedicated to promoting equality and fighting social injustice at his place of work and at home in his local community.

GT Scholars is a social enterprise that provides tutoring, mentoring and enrichment to young people from a range of backgrounds. To find out more about our volunteering opportunities, please get in touch with us. 

7 Ways You or a Tutor can Prepare Your Child for Oxbridge

7 Ways You or a Tutor can Prepare Your Child for Oxbridge

Parents University What's new?

The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge (collectively known as Oxbridge) are two of the most prestigious universities not only in the UK but in the world. They have a long history, rich in heritage and tradition, that goes back at least nine centuries. They are globally recognised as being places of focus for learning, culture, and for intellectual debate.

It comes as no surprise that with such high esteem, both the universities are highly sought after by new students from all over the world. It’s extremely competitive to get into Oxbridge. In fact, in 2016 more than 19 000 people applied for the 3 200 undergraduate places at Oxford.

These figures are certainly daunting for students who wish to apply to these universities. It is clear that only the best of the best make the cut, so prospective students need to make sure that they really stand out from the immense crowd of applicants.

Children who aspire to study at Oxbridge will often need extra support from their parents, and that is not just about the funding. So here are seven ways that parents can prepare their bright children for a place at these elite universities.

  • Start preparation early: To study at Oxbridge, it is not just the early bird that catches the worm, but the early prepared bird. Dr Samina Khan, head of student admissions at Oxford, believes that children should start preparing for Oxbridge at the age of 11, and not just when they reach the sixth form. Children need ample time to develop and master their passion for subjects, which will help give them an advantage over others during interviews and applications. Thus, parents should make sure that their aspiring children start preparation early.
  • Provide additional resources: To stand out, prospective students need to show true mastery of and passion for the subject that relates to their desired degree programme. To develop this mastery, students should go over and beyond their high school curriculum. Their parents can support them by funding their specific extracurricular activities, providing them with books and research resources, and allowing them to do voluntary or even paid work. For example, if a student wants to study medicine at Oxbridge, the parent can fund extra science classes, provide them with books and supplies that will increase their skills, and allow them to volunteer at hospitals and other health facilities.
  • Inform them of their choices: It is important that children are not just prepared for Oxbridge, but also prepared for the journey to Oxbridge. Children need to know what they need to achieve and how much work they will need to be put in for them to realise their aspiration. By informing children well in advance of the responsibilities of choosing Oxbridge, parents can avoid building too much of pressure on them during preparation. Pressure on any person has damaging effects, but pressure on children to achieve something has lasting negative effects on their young minds and their future. It is also important to know the difference between informing and discouraging children, as you do not want to discourage a child from having an aspiration.
  • Take a tour of the university: Parents can encourage an interest in Oxbridge by visiting the institutions with their children. As Dr Khan said, children are growing up in an age of Harry Potter, where the traditions and historical appeal of Hogwarts are appreciated and desired. Unlike Hogwarts, Oxford and Cambridge are real places of learning, but they still have the charm and beauty of tradition and magical gothic architecture. Visiting would create a desire that will encourage children to earnestly put their minds to get a place. Follow the link for more information on visiting and tour times for Oxford or Cambridge.
  • Do your own research: The application process is difficult and lengthy. There are forms to fill and documents to get and interviews to prepare for – it is a daunting task for a child. Parents have more experience with filling out forms and doing interviews, so they should find out what they need and start collecting documents well in advance so as to decrease the load on their child. Parents should also do research on funding, scholarships, accommodation and other matters well in advance to prepare accordingly.
  • Get them a mentor: Parents do not know everything. Perhaps they did not go to Oxbridge or they did not go to university at all, so they do not know how to advise their aspiring children. Thus, getting a mentor for their children would do wonders by providing them with all the necessary skills and knowledge. The mentor could be an Oxbridge alumnus or even educated in the field of interest, and could help them with the application process, with resources of interest, or even just some good direction and confidence boosting.
  • Enroll them in a course or workshop: With 19 000 undergraduate applicants, it would make sense that many prospective students are seeking help when applying to Oxbridge. Thus, there are many courses and workshops available that provide valuable assistance such as developing an outstanding personal statement and how to prepare for interviews. These courses and workshops can also provide important insider information and bursary opportunities.

Parents provide a vital support system when their children are applying to any university. This support system becomes even more important when applying to Oxbridge due to the high amount of applicants, which creates a considerable amount of pressure on children. As you can see, there are several ways parents can make an Oxbridge education possible for their child, which can almost guarantee them to have a bright and prosperous future.

GT Scholars knows the importance of preparing students for Oxbridge and wants to be a helpful part of the journey. We provide a one-day course on how to get into Oxbridge which includes working with Oxbridge graduates, admissions professionals and interview professionals that will show your child how to develop an outstanding personal statement and how to choose a degree course for their chosen career. They will also support your child with preparing for interviews and give advice on A-level subjects and grades required for specific universities and specific courses.

Find out more about the course here. We also provide an excellent mentorship programme which employs a variety of well-educated and knowledgeable mentors that will give your child the edge over any other Oxbridge applicant. You can find out more about the mentorship programme here.

In The Know: Code Like a Ninja!

In The Know: Code Like a Ninja!

In The Know What's new?

It’s the last day of school for most young people in London and the summer holiday is the perfect time to discover new interests. This week, we’ve listed three activities that promote the development of young people’s coding or software development skills.

CoderDojo: This volunteer-led community aims to offer free programming lessons to young people between the ages of 7 and 17. Individual clubs or Dojos, act independently to offer programming knowledge in an effort to address the global shortage of programmers. Each Dojo has its own rules regarding registration and attendance. To attend, young people need to have a laptop but some Dojos do have spare laptops to lend. For more information, click here

Teens code the collection: The British Museum has a free event scheduled for teenagers between the ages of 13 and 15 years of age. Young people will be taught how to create LED badges using the new BBC micro:bit. Creations will be inspired by medals and brooches from the Museum’s own collection. This event will be held on the 5th of August between 11:00 to 1600 at the Samsung Discovery Centre . For more information, click here

Code Academy: This interactive online platform offers free classes in 12 different programming languages. Programming languages that offered include JavaScript, Ruby on Rails, AngularJS, SQL, Java, HTML, CSS, PHP and Python. The site boasts over 25 million users from around the world and has a “Pro” paid option which gives access to learning plans, quizzes, realistic projects and live help from advisors. For more information, click here.

Thinking of what to do next year? The GT Scholars programme is an after-school programme for young people aged 11-16. Our goal is to help young people achieve excellent grades, especially in STEM fields. We’ve still got a few spaces left for young people that want to join GT Scholars next term. If you’re interested, you’ll need to register your interest here or give us a call on 02088168066

PS: ‘In the know’ will be taking a short break from Tuesday 1st August to Friday 25th August as there will be limited availability in the office. You can still reach the office during this period as we’ll still be open during normal office hours Monday-Friday from 9am-5pm.

In The Know: Career Options for Young People!

In The Know: Career Options for Young People!

Growth mindset In The Know What's new? Work experience

We’re getting closer to the holidays and there are lots of open days and projects for young people that would like to explore their career options. The holidays give them a chance to carry out research on their own interests and develop competencies. Listed below are some events and activities that offer avenues of exploration for young minds.

Reed Smith Career Open Day: Those interested in a career in Law can learn more about it by attending an open day at Reed Smith, a global law firm. The firm is well known for its work in the following areas: shipping, financial services, life sciences, energy, natural resources, advertising, technology and media. The open day is open to young people between the ages of 16 to 18 years of age and will be conducted on the 28th of July. For more information, click here.

Youth Project: Innovator Projects: Young people that have ideas on social action projects that innovate and create new things, are invited to apply for funding of up to £500. This opportunity is open to projects with a leader between the ages of 15 to 24 years of age. The project must benefit the applicant’s’ community or young people who live in the community and achievable with £500 or less. Use of digital means or platforms is encouraged in creating or working on the project. For more information, click here.

SKY Work Experience in TV Operations: Sky is seeking young people who are analytical, inquisitive and have an interest in technology to apply for a week long work experience programme in TV Operations. Successful applicants will get a chance to work in Broadcast Delivery Planning, Live Content Delivery, Playout and Broadcast Platforms. The closing date for applications is the 30th of July and applicants must be 16 years and over. For more information, click here.

If your child is aged 11-16 and you’re interested in joining the tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme, we’ve still got a few spaces left for young people that want to join GT Scholars next term. If you’re interested, you’ll need to register your interest here or give us a call on 02088168066