Friends of GT Scholars – Are you available to help out at one of our events?

Friends of GT Scholars – Are you available to help out at one of our events?

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

I hope you’ve had a great week so far and you’re looking forward to the weekend? Did you know that this evening will be the rise of the first super moon of the year? It’s when the moon is at the closest point to earth in its orbit. For science enthusiasts, this is great news… for everyone else, they’re probably wondering why on earth this matters! Either way, the super moon is said to be a beautiful sight!

 

Could you volunteer at one of our upcoming events?
The first couple of workshops for the Inspiring Future Leaders programme will take place on Thursday the 20th and Friday the 21st of February at Google Academy from 10:30am to 4:00pm. We’re looking for event volunteers to help on any of these days. As an event volunteer, you’ll get to meet and interact with the young people and also work closely with the workshop facilitators.  Please let me know if you’re able to help and I’ll fill you in on some more details about these workshops.

Would you like to help us reach more volunteers?
In today’s technology-driven world, you can instantly connect with colleagues, friends and family. This makes reaching out to volunteers and young people easy, connecting people who can help with young people who need help! It would be great if you could help us reach more volunteers by telling a friend or colleague about us. You can refer them to our contact page, or you can get in touch with us and we’ll send you some material that you can forward to them.

Equality in education is still worth fighting for!
Recent figures from the Department of Education showed that pupils from a low-income background are falling further behind their wealthier peers in GCSE Achievement. A recent news article by MSN News UK reported that the gap between disadvantaged and advantaged students has widened, with 27.5% of disadvantaged pupils that were entered for all of the EBacc last year, compared with 44.5% of all other students. In 2018 the gap was 26.4% versus 42.8%. Follow this link to our blog to find out why we still believe that equality in education and private tutoring is still a realistic and worthwhile pursuit. 

 

Have a great weekend!

Friends of GT Scholars – Could you share your volunteer experience with parents?

Friends of GT Scholars – Could you share your volunteer experience with parents?

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

Wow, it feels like this week just flew by! I hope your week has been great so far? First things first, we’d like to thank everyone who volunteered their time to sit on our judging panel at the Dragon’s Den Challenge last week, and very special thank you to Moe Hashimi and 42 Acres for their support! You guys rock! Before the weekend starts, I’d like to remind you of a few upcoming events and volunteer opportunities.

Could you be a speaker at our parent information session?
Another great way to volunteer is to be a speaker at one of our information sessions. As a speaker you’ll be sharing your volunteer experience with parents who are interested in enrolling their child in the Bright Ambitions Programme There will be two sessions on Saturday 14th December – the first one will be from 3:00pm – 4:30pm and the second one will be from 5:00pm. If you’ve volunteered as a tutor or mentor in the past year and would like to join our panel, please let me know and I’ll get in touch with more details.

Will we see you at the next Volunteer Meetup?
Our next Volunteer Meetup is less than two weeks away and the RSVP’s are coming in!  All Friends of GT Scholars are welcome! This includes current volunteers, volunteer applicants and anyone that is interested in volunteering with young people, so please feel free to invite your friends and colleagues. If you’d like to join us on Wednesday 11th December from 6:30pm to 9pm at Airspace, London W1D 2DR, click here to register your attendance. We look forward to seeing you there!

Do you want to know more about the Future Leaders Programme?
The Future Leaders programme is a new programme sponsored by the Mayor of London and will start in January and run until July 2020. This programme will focus on young boys in London at risk of exclusion, between the ages of 12-14. Young boys joining the programme have been identified as having high aspirations but also struggling with some challenging issues in their personal lives. We’re looking for volunteer mentors to deliver monthly face-to-face mentoring sessions in London. Please feel free to contact me if you’re interested in becoming a mentor.

Friends of GT Scholars – Will you be joining us at the next volunteer meetup?!

Friends of GT Scholars – Will you be joining us at the next volunteer meetup?!

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

Good morning and happy Friday! I hope your week has been great so far and that you have some exciting plans lined up for the weekend. It’s been a week of strange news. I read about Hurricane Dorian in the US, where cows were found swimming in the sea! Who knew that cows could swim?! But enough of my random rantings here’s this week less random newsletter…

Join us at our next meetup!
It would be great if you can make it to our next Volunteer Meetup where you can meet fellow volunteers and workshop facilitators. During the evening, we’ll be giving you an update on our programmes and the difference that it’s made. New volunteers still in the application stage can complete their document verification with one of our team members at the meetup. The meetup will be on Thursday 12th December from  6:30pm to 9pm. In the meantime, you can pencil the date in your diary. An invite will be emailed to you shortly! 

Spotlight on volunteers!
We’re looking for volunteers that would like to feature in our Volunteer Spotlight interview series. This interview series is a great way for us to celebrate our fantastic volunteers and the amazing work they’re doing and share more about their talent, dedication and motivation for volunteering. If you’ve volunteered as a tutor, mentor or helped out at one or more of our events in the past year, we’d love to set up an interview with you. Please feel free to let me know! Interviews will be done during November and December.

Share, Like, Tweet & Repost!
We’d love for you to help us build our online presence in order to reach more volunteers and young people to get involved with our programmes and events.  It’s easy, connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn and share or invite your friends to join! You’ll also receive notifications and stay up to date on new blog posts, current news and events and important real-time announcements. 

Have a terrific weekend!

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Arash Khosravi

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Arash Khosravi

Online volunteering Volunteer spotlight Volunteers What's new?

Tell me a little bit about you and what got you to where you are today?
I went through school and after that, I did Economics at A-level and then studied Economics full time at UCL. During my time at UCL, I was the president of the UCL branch of the charity Team Up. After graduation, I was offered a job at the Bank of England where I worked as a Data Analyst.

What made you decide to become a volunteer tutor?
I really feel like I want to give back to society and give back to people that are in a less fortunate position than I am, through no fault of their own, and help them achieve their full potential. I did some informal tutoring a few years ago and I got really good feedback. That made me think and I then decided to take my strengths and use them to help people that really need the support. Since volunteering at UCL, I was trying to find other opportunities to volunteer that could fit in with my work schedule. I find that tutoring is a really good option and that I can make a real difference in a young person’s life.

What did you enjoy most about tutoring your scholar?
What I enjoyed most was really seeing the development of my scholar throughout the 12 week term. I think the highlight for me was in week 4 when I logged into Skype for our session and my scholar said: ‘’Sir, sir you know the thing we’ve done with the area of the square? I tried it in class and my teacher said I got the question right!” She was really chuffed about it and that was great to hear. I think engaging with the scholar and building a good relationship is what I’ve enjoyed most. I was very lucky to be matched with someone who is really engaged and ready to learn.

What challenges have you helped your scholar to face?
What I found at the beginning of this term in my scholar was the fact that she was doubting herself. I think the challenge was to reinforce the knowledge she already had and building her confidence. In the beginning, I would ask a question and she would attempt to solve 60% of the question but wouldn’t have the confidence to work through the remaining 40%. She would then say she did not know how to do it. I focussed on building her confidence and to say to herself, I do know how to do it and I won’t give up. It’s really great to see how much her maths has developed and improved.

What goals have you helped your scholar to achieve?
I think a good example of one of our goals would be the mock test my scholar had coming up. A week before the mock test we did two tutoring sessions so I could help her prepare for the test. After the test, she came back and said that a lot of the work we revised did come up in the test and she really felt confident answering them. We also set up goals for some of the topics she felt a bit weaker in and although she was struggling with it earlier on in the term she was able to tackle them after a few week’s sessions.

Why do you think tutoring is valuable to young people?
Because I feel that students at school have a wide range of abilities and are at different levels. I don’t think that the modern skill system can factor that in with a class of 30 students, with different abilities and learning styles. Some young people need additional support and a lot of them don’t have the opportunity to get 1-to-1 support and can fall behind. I think tutoring can help fill that gap between school and home. Free tutoring is great to bridge the gap between young people who can afford private tutoring and those who cant.

Do you have a message for young people?
I would say they should keep working, keep trying and keep persevering with whatever they want to do in life. There’s no one path to get you where you want to go. Be who you are and don’t try to be anyone else. And with that mindset try things and really persevere. Like with the GT Scholar Programme, even if you don’t get the results initially, keep trying and pushing forward and towards where you want to go.

How important has support been in getting you to where you are today?
My dad is a maths lecturer, I could not get away from maths as a young person (laughs). Until about GCSE I was rubbish at maths, I used to get 40%. I think it was because I wanted to get away from maths because my dad will always be talking about it. At that age, I did not realise the importance of it. Until my dad sat me down and got me to engage and focus and made me realise the importance of it. In terms of other subjects, I did not have formal tutors but had support from my peers and family that helped me a lot.

What have you gained from volunteering with GT Scholars?
I feel like I gained a lot of confidence. I was a bit nervous before my first session because I see it as a real responsibility and duty to help a young person on their journey with mathematics. I really wanted to do a good job and make an impact on my scholar’s life. Having my scholar come back by the fourth session saying how she benefited from our sessions had really boosted my confidence. I think there are a lot of children out there that don’t see their own potential and it’s really opened my eyes to that. I have also gained a great relationship with my scholar and we even joke around during sessions sometimes.

Would you recommend becoming a tutor with GT Scholars?
Definitely. I think the whole process is really good and I gained a lot from the experience. For a tutor to be able to come in and really feel the positive impact made with a scholar and really seeing the journey you’re both going through during the 12 weeks is just amazing. The programme is really great for those scholars who are at average or just below, to give them that extra boost they need. Volunteering as a tutor is a nice way to start volunteering, whether it’s your first time or if you’re an experienced volunteer. I definitely recommend it in terms of it being a great way to volunteer and help young people.

Is Private Tuition Widening The Gap In Attainment?

Is Private Tuition Widening The Gap In Attainment?

What's new?

Every young person has subjects they thrive in, and other subjects that are not so easy for them to get to understand. We all know that high-quality private tutoring can be of great assistance when trying to improve their grades in these subjects.

With this being known, over the past few years, private tuition has exponentially grown in popularity as a way of improving grades. However, this has also had a negative effect on young people from the lowest income homes as they continue to find themselves attaining grades much lower than to their peers from the highest income homes.

And unfortunately, we also live in a world where private schools thrive with state-of-the-art facilities while state schools continue to struggle with budget cuts, a teacher retention crisis and large classroom sizes, which makes it nearly impossible for young people from lower income homes to compete with their peers from higher-income homes.

The numerous programmes to improve performance
What makes the gap in attainment between state school students and independent schools even wider, is the ease at which a typical student from a wealthier home can access high-quality private tuition and coaching programmes to help boost their grades, build study skills, improve their mindset and prepare for interviews to get into top universities.

All you need to do is a simple search in google for “Oxbridge preparation courses” and you’ll find hundreds of organisations that cater to the needs of wealthier pupils that are gunning for Oxbridge. They have the advantage of providing skilled professionals to support students preparing for Oxbridge & Russell Group universities in the UK.

You don’t have to attend these courses to get into the universities, but from what can be seen by their success rate, it would be safe to say that the courses have an effect on each pupil’s confidence and motivation, ultimately giving these students an advantage over their peers. It is also clear that the students who attend these programmes tend to be wealthier than your average state school student which reveals why the top universities are filled with students from wealthier backgrounds.

What’s available to students from lower income homes?
For your typical student from a lower-income home, these types of services are not locally available, not available in their school or simply not affordable. Moreover, most parents are not even aware of the additional support that these students need.

Having said this, there are still quite a few charitable organisations and top universities that run programmes to encourage children from lower-income homes to apply to their universities. The programmes will support and coach students from lower income homes, but the reality is that these courses are highly competitive and you’ll need to show evidence of having a very low income, going to one of their priority schools and students will need to have achieved very high grades in order to get in.

There is a strong case for affordable high-quality tuition
Tutoring programmes are very important for students who need help with a difficult subject, but also for those that need extra general support and help with exams and study skills. A private tutor can also make the difference between gaining the grades necessary for the future or falling short and missing out on future opportunities.

Private tutoring can benefit any young person, including those:

  • Who are not achieving the grades they expect or have been predicted due to struggles at school or at home
  • Who are not receiving the level of support necessary in school, whether in specific subjects or in general
  • Who, for any reason, have had to take an extended period of time away from their studies
  • Who want to focus further on a specific subject that they may not necessarily be struggling with, but desire to study at university and need to secure high grades to ensure this is possible.

How can we narrow the attainment gap
There are many ways to narrow the attainment gap, but one sure way is to help young people from low-income homes to receive the same support provided to those from wealthier homes.

For your child, there are many new and innovative programmes that are seeking to narrow this gap by providing high-quality tutoring and other educational programmes at an affordable rate.

The GT Scholars Programme one such programme that offers high-quality one-to-one tutoring at an affordable rate. We also offer a number of free places every term. Our programmes provide more than just private tuition – it also includes mentoring sessions, enrichment days, and skill-building workshops to help your child not only with their studies but also with developing life skills and confidence. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

Meet one of our Volunteer Mentors – Sophie Germain

Meet one of our Volunteer Mentors – Sophie Germain

Volunteer mentors Volunteer spotlight Volunteers What's new?

Who are the volunteer mentors of GT Scholars? Every once in a while we conduct an interview with one of our amazing volunteers so we can introduce them to you and share the good work they have been doing. Our volunteers form a crucial part of GT Scholars and their charitable deeds never goes unnoticed. We spoke to the lovely Sophie Germain to find out her views on social mobility and what she enjoys most about volunteering with GT Scholars.

Could you tell us about what led you to volunteering as a mentor with GT Scholars??
I try to explore a different area each year and I felt that volunteering with teenagers is one of the demographics I have not worked with before. I wanted to do something that was accessible to a lot of people and that was not limited to only a certain area you live in, the school you go to etc.

What are some of your opinions about social mobility?
In London, a perceived good area and a not so good area can be found in a commutable distance from one another. There are a lot of things to see and do and a lot is available for free. Perhaps in smaller towns, this mix is harder to find. Also once you’ve passed the stage of institutional education and you’ve started your career you are less likely to be type-casted based on where you went to school and it’s more about your experience. I went to a state school and some of my friends were in private schools but both groups have ended up in equivalent positions. Sometimes if you have a plan and you are dedicated to it, it is easier to achieve a particular goal if you have access to the correct information and the right people around you. However, there are certain historical and cultural issues that are still at play today that puts up barriers for some people. For example, an issue like the gender pay gap review due to male dominated boardrooms and industries. Balancing this will take a long time and to do it in a way that is fairer.

How did you come to this conclusion?
London has quite a high diversity level and when I was growing up it was common for children to socialise with other children who have a very different background to their own. In regards to gender, changes in attitude need to come from men and women. Including better grounds for the way children are raised and not pigeonholing them based on aspects such as gender. It also requires being open-minded in recruiting positions to not focus on gender, race, economic background, social circles etc.

What would you tell someone who is considering volunteering with GT Scholars?
It is a well-operated volunteer programme so I would recommend people to get involved. You get the chance to share new ideas and methods of learning with a young person who can benefit from it. It is nice to hear the dreams of a young person and help them to access the tools that they need to achieve them.

What do you enjoy the most about being a volunteer at GT Scholars? Well, it is early days for me because I have only done two terms so far. I would like to get more involved in the open days. But I would say that I enjoyed giving my mentees a positive outlook on what can be achieved. For some people, teenage years can be quite difficult to go through. I tell my mentees about the different perspective of other people and prepare them to have the skills to deal with other people’s opinions and encourage them to be focused.

What is your message or advice to young people of today?

I would suggest that they try as many new things as they can whilst they are young. This helps to build up experience, meet different people and get familiar with what they like and dislike. I would also advise not to become overburdened with things and take the time to learn what brings them inner peace, as I think it is an important part of getting to know oneself. Don’t be overly judgemental and learn how to maintain a healthy balanced lifestyle.

As a Kingston University graduate, I can apply the skills that I’ve learned and I can also share the passion of what the core company is. I study philosophy in my spare time and enjoy staying fit.

Sophie enjoys her professional career as it falls in her line of interest and previous studies. She works for AEG Europe as an analyst in the live sports and music industry. Her company offers a Giving Back Day to employees for volunteering.

GT Scholars is a social enterprise that provides tutoring, mentoring and enrichment to young people from a range of backgrounds. To find out more about our volunteering opportunities, please get in touch with us.

In the Know – Activities for British Science Week 2018!

In the Know – Activities for British Science Week 2018!

In The Know Parents What's new?

British Science Week is an annual ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths, featuring entertaining and engaging events and activities across the UK for young people and adults. Below are some of these activities to get your child excited about science this week.

British Science Week Poster Competition
Creative students can immerse themselves in science by taking part in this poster competition. The theme for this year is exploration and discovery, and there is an array of great prizes up for grabs. Students can enter individually or as a team, with help from their school. In the senior category, entrants must be in Year 7 to 9. There is still time to submit your poster as the closing date for entries is Friday the 6th of April 2018. Find out more here.

App Design Workshop
This free workshop is for young aspirational app designers between the ages of 10 and 14. At this event, they will learn more about designing digital products and software, and by the end of the workshop, they would have produced their first app prototype to present to the group. Additionally, they will also learn about presentation skills and practice. The event is taking place tomorrow, Saturday the 17th of March 2018 from 9.30am to 5pm at the Woolwich Centre Library. Find out more here.

Zoom In: A Closer Look at Science
Part of the Science Week programme at the British Museum, this free event promises to be interesting. You will get a chance to meet the Museum’s scientists and conservators, and take a closer look at work that goes on behind the scenes. You will also discover how science unlocks objects’ secrets, learn about techniques used to preserve objects for future generations, and see the latest technology in action. The event is taking place tomorrow, Saturday the 17th of March 2018 from 10am to 4pm at the Great Court in the British Museum. Find out more here.

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.

In the Know – Apprenticeship opportunities to kick-start your career!

In the Know – Apprenticeship opportunities to kick-start your career!

In The Know Parents What's new?

An apprenticeship gives young people hands-on experience, a salary and the opportunity to train while they work, and is available across a wide range of industries and organisations, from local businesses to large national brands. Here are some resources for your child to find out more about apprenticeships or to find the perfect apprenticeship to kick-start their career.

Get In, Go Far
With government funding of apprenticeship schemes increasing every year, this is their official apprenticeships website. You can search thousands of vacancies from great companies in a range of industries, from engineering to nursing, and law to design. The levels of apprenticeship on offer range from level 2 (equivalent to GCSE) right up to higher and degree apprenticeships. There are also great resources for parents to learn more about apprenticeships. Find out more here.

Future Talent
This online resource is specifically designed for school and college leavers looking for their next step, whether that is an apprenticeship, school leaver programme, entry-level job, or a sponsored learning programme. Their platform is easy to use and you can discover, search and apply for a variety of different opportunities. They also provide advice about applying for roles and insights into what it’s like working in different industries. You can register for free here.

The Apprenticeship Guide
The Apprenticeship Guide contains concise summaries of every apprenticeship framework offered in England, plus general careers advice, real-life stories, a regional directory of training providers and much more. The Guide is fully revised and updated annually, as the world of apprenticeships changes constantly as new schemes are created and old schemes are revised. Take a look for yourself here.

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.

Think you don’t need maths tutoring? Think again!

Think you don’t need maths tutoring? Think again!

Growth mindset Post 16 Private tutoring University What's new? Young people

Imagine for a moment that you are sitting in a restaurant. A waiter walks over to your table to take your order, “One double cheeseburger, a medium chips and a regular coke, please”, the waiter jots down the order and reads it back to you, you nod, satisfied and he walks off. As you sit there waiting for your food, the restaurant starts to fill up, a family of four take the table to your left. A young couple is guided to a table directly in front of you. There is a group of ladies; celebrating a bachelorette party, fourteen in total guided to a collection of tables lined up in the centre of the room.

More people come and a few leave as you sit there an hour later and still no food. You notice that the young couple, sitting opposite from you, is staring lovingly into each other’s eyes over two orders of delicious looking ribs and mashed potatoes. You look at the table with the bachelorette and her posse, where one of the ladies is making a toast as the others enjoy an array of starters.

You look to the family of four, study their frowns, their “plateless” table and think to yourself at least you are not alone; they too, are victims of this appalling service. At least that is until your waiter arrives at their table, their orders on a tray. Fuming now, you wait until they are served and then call your waiter over to your table. “What in the world is going on, where is my food?” you demand. The waiter looks at you as if you are crazy, absolutely bonkers, “What are you talking about sir, the chef is starting on your order as we speak?”

“Starting, he is only starting!” You shout, shocked by the complete disregard for you, the casual dismissiveness of your waiter’s answer and the outright injustice of it all. “I’ve been here for over an hour, most of the people you have served came after me, I was first and yet they get their food before me…” “So what?” your waiter says, cutting you off mid-sentence. Of course, you can’t believe what he just said; you are at a loss for words. Your waiter looks toward three of his colleagues approaching, trays overloaded with soft drinks, ten double cheeseburgers and eighteen medium packets of chips

Your waiter smiles, “Here comes your order sir,” he tells you. “This is not my order,” you say as the three waiters carrying the trays begin to offload on your table. “What do you mean sir?” Your waiter seems genuinely surprised, “Did you not order, double cheeseburgers, medium chips and cokes.” “I ordered one double cheeseburger, one medium chips and one regular coke, not this mess.”  You are yelling now, beyond boiling point. “But sir, what difference does it make, whether we serve you first or last, two cheeseburgers or ten?” Your waiter asks sincerely, “Are you not the one who said, you do not need math?” You just sit there, unable to speak. “Oh yes, and this meal will cost you two hundred and thirty-seven thousand pounds. Now is that going to be cash or card?”

Ok, I admit that this is a bit extreme, or is it? Shakuntala Devi once wrote: “Without mathematics, there’s nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers.”

I want you to ask yourself, what do you want for your future? Do you hope to own a house someday, own a car? Well, those come with payments like taxes, mortgage, and insurance and you will need math to calculate those or risk paying too much, two hundred and thirty-seven thousand pounds for a cheeseburger as an example.

How about your career of choice? Math is needed for almost every single profession in the world. If you want to be a biologist, archaeologist, an attorney or work as a cashier at Tesco, it is without a doubt that numbers will be part and parcel of the job. Basically, you will never be able to live without math so accept it and try to make learning math fun.

A friend once told me, “I want to be a photographer, what do I need to know about calculus or trigonometry?” Well, that is quite simple actually, a photographer will need to calculate the depth of field, determine the correct film speed, shutter speed, aperture, and exposure, and so much more.

Do you like playing video games, Playstation, Xbox, Wii, and others? Do you have a few killer ideas that you just know will make great games? If so, guess what? Math is a necessity. Aspiring video game programmers will need to study trigonometry, physics, and calculus.

As a boy, I had dreams of becoming an astronaut, “to go where no man has gone before.” If that’s you, then consider this, astronauts use maths in order to make precise mathematical calculations, from how the spacecraft leaves Earth’s atmosphere to how the astronauts pilot the craft. So no math, no Captain Kirk.

Math is a necessity and when considering the uses and benefits thereof there are a number of reasons to learn math:

  • Develop your “lifelong learning” skills:  Asking others for help, looking stuff up, learning to deeply focus on tasks, being organized, etc.
  • Develop your work ethic:  Not making excuses, not blaming others, not being lazy, being on time, not giving up so easily, etc.  This is more important for “success” than raw IQ. There is no shortcut.
  • Get better at learning complicated things.  You are less afraid of complex ideas and classes.
  • Develop pride & confidence in your ability to understand complicated things.  This is not fake self-esteem, but one that is earned.
  • Certain careers in science, health, technology, and engineering require serious Math skills.

Studies suggest that intelligent & motivated people are generally more interesting and happier. Your frontal lobe is not done developing until the age of  25-27. The more things you can learn before reaching that age, the more things you can learn over your lifetime. A survey concluded that 20% to 40% of college freshmen take remedial courses.  Do you want to retake high school courses in college, or do you want to take real college classes?

If you need assistance with Maths or English, sign up for GT Scholars flagship programme, GT Scholars Academic  Programme. This programme not only has tutoring in Maths or English, but also provides skill-building, enrichment and mentoring.  Keep a lookout for our enrichment days and our skill-building workshops by signing up to our newsletter.

In the Know –  Plan your career and reach all your goals!

In the Know – Plan your career and reach all your goals!

In The Know Parents What's new?

Career planning is an essential part of a young person’s personal growth and development, and it is an opportunity for them to maximise their potential. It is also an effective way to ensure that they never lose motivation along the way by planning for the future and setting a specific timeline for reaching their career goals. Here a few great resources to help you and your child with their career planning.

GT Scholars Career Day 2018
Our annual Career Day is taking place on Saturday the 3rd of March 2018. This exciting workshop is the perfect opportunity for you and your child to hear firsthand from a panel of young professionals in a range of careers. By the end of the workshop, your child should have an idea of some the careers that may be suited to their strengths, abilities and personality. The workshop is taking place at Goldsmiths University in New Cross from 10am to 4pm. Book your tickets here.

Careers Advice for Parents
This website is a substantial source of career advice that is specifically tailored to the parents and carers of young people. Developed by professional career advisers, this site will aid you when it comes to advising your child on choosing their career path, explaining how different qualifications work, researching different sectors and options such as apprenticeships, understanding the job market, and so much more. Take a look for yourself here.

Real Talk
This app is perfect for young people who want relevant and timely career advice from people who have been there, done that, and are willing to share their career story. They have gathered hundreds of the best stories from young professionals who have excelled in the job market in a wide variety of career fields. You can bookmark, like, and share the careers that interest you, while building a checklist of resources to help you plan life after high school. The app is free and available for both Apple and Android.

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on social mobility, growth mindset and helping young people to achieve their aspirations. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. If you would like to know more, please contact us here.