In The Know: Summer School options

In The Know: Summer School options

In The Know University What's new? Young people

Although it might not seem like it, summer is not that far away! Instead of playing on the computer or watching the television for the whole holiday, your child could join one of these exciting programmes and get a head start on their future.

Pre-University Taster – King’s College London (Ages 16-17)
This is a four-day non-residential programme, designed for students aged 16-17, that enables them to find out what it is like to study one of the world’s top universities. Your child would get to choose between four areas of study: Law, Science, Business Management and Cultural History, and would receive university-level tuition, relevant excursions and admissions advice. Read more about this taster course here.

Summer Schools – Debate Chamber (Ages 11-18)
Whatever your child is interested in, Debate Chamber has a course that will be ideal for them! They have a range of programmes, adapted to suit every age group, from law and computer science to dentistry and medicine. These are non-residential courses that vary in length, but all of them build attendees’ knowledge through tuition, discussions and practical activities. Debate Chamber do offer bursaries, so to find the right course for your child, visit their website.

Pre-Vet Summer School – Royal Veterinary College (Ages 16+)
Is your child thinking of a career in veterinary medicine or biological science? This 2-week residential summer school is the perfect taster course for young people aged 16+ who want to learn more about these career paths. Your child will practise in state of the art clinical facilities and will participate in teaching sessions and workshops, all while getting a glimpse into university life. To find out more and complete the application form, visit their website.

On a side note, we will be starting our new term in April and are looking for aspirational and motivated young people to join the programme. If you are interested and want to find out more, please leave your details here and we will give you a call.

Find out how we are able to provide free private tutoring to young people from low income homes

Find out how we are able to provide free private tutoring to young people from low income homes

Narrowing the gap Social mobility University Volunteers What's new?

Research from Sutton Trust’s shows that 42% of students in London have paid for private tutoring at some point in their academic careers. In addition to this, privately educated pupils are more than twice as likely to have received tutoring at some point in their academic lives compared to state educated pupils.

Research from the Education Endowment Foundation shows that tutoring can accelerate learning by up to 5 months within a year.  So why aren’t more young people from lower income homes making use of tutors? The reality is that high quality tutoring is simply not affordable. The average rate for tutoring in London about £30 per hour.

When we launched GT Scholars one of the first things we noticed was that there were more online search enquiries for private tuition from families from higher income homes than those from lower income homes. This was initially surprising as we couldn’t understand why we weren’t getting many more enquiries from families from low income homes.

Despite our relatively low costs and our offer of free places, the programme seemed to attract more people from higher income homes.It took us a while for us to see that many of our target market – parents of young people from lower income homes – were not looking for private home tutoring.

Their families were less likely to look for a tutor because tutoring can be expensive and from a parent’s point of view, particularly parents with a relatively low income – private tutoring was seen as risky especially if you don’t have the money or the right network to help you find or afford the right tutor.

When we discussed the search for a private tutor – many explained that they had stopped looking for a tutor because they believed there was no such thing as affordable private tutoring. It’s hard to justify paying a private tutor £40 per hour if you only earn £10/hour. We realised that many parents from lower income homes often saw private tutoring as a luxury that they just could not afford.

On the other hand, parents from wealthier homes, even those that that were already paying for private schools, saw private tutoring an essential part of learning that they cannot afford to miss out on.

Most people would agree that young people from low income homes should be able to access additional support through after-school tutoring – if they need it.

Over the past few years, we have found that that the best way to reach young people from low income homes is to reach them directly through their schools and offer free or low cost workshops and courses for parents to access additional support.

This gives parents a chance to meet us in person and understand some of the benefits of the programme and access support through our short courses and workshops when needed. We also encourage parents to sign up to our weekly newsletter ‘In the know’ which gives parents an idea of activities and opportunities that are available to their child.

There is no denying that private tutoring is here to stay. It’s a booming industry and becoming a way of life for many people especially those from higher income homes. The only way to make this fair is to offer some form of means-tested tuition including some free places – and this is the story of GT Scholars.

The GT Scholars programme is a not-for-profit after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme open to pupils in your school in Years 7 to 11. Pupils on the programme receive support from volunteer tutors from some of the top universities in London and volunteer mentors from top companies and organisations in London.

Parents pay means tested fees based on total household income and private tutoring fees range from £9 to £26. We use all 100% of our profits to ensure that at least 1 in 7 places are entirely free of charge to pupils from the lowest income groups. The majority of our pupils are from low income homes with household income under £25,000. We are currently using our social enterprise to provide 1 free place for every 6 paying pupils. Our goal is to be able to offer 1 in 3 free places by 2020.

The programme is entirely free of charge for schools to participate and we ensure that free places only go to young people from low income homes that have a genuine need for the programme.

If you work in a school in London and would like to know more about how the GT Scholars programme can benefit pupils in your school, contact us using the following link: www.gtscholars.org/contact-us

Do Apprenticeships Perpetuate a Two-Tier System?

Do Apprenticeships Perpetuate a Two-Tier System?

Narrowing the gap Research Social mobility University

A report has shown that doubts over the value of a university degree means that 4 out of 5 parents would prefer their child to pursue a form of apprenticeship over a university education. But GT Scholars wonders if it is this attitude towards higher-education that has helped strengthen the UK’s two-tier education system?

Raised university fees and the scrapping of the bursary will most likely have a negatively impact social mobility

With parental pressure towards vocational training, as well as fears over taking out large student loans, it’s no surprise that official figures suggest that poor teenagers are almost half as likely to go on to university than richer classmates. It’s likely that this means many gifted and talented children from less wealthy families are put off applying to university because of their socio-economic situation.

This is in stark contrast to parents from wealthier families who aren’t just more encouraging towards their children’s higher-education ambitions, but they are more likely to spend money on private tuition to help them gain access to the best colleges and universities. These parents have often taken on student debt themselves, have positive experiences of university and understand the value of a degree.

Graduates have traditionally earned more than their non-graduate peers

Scepticism over the value of a degree isn’t uncommon, but a recent study revealed that the majority of graduates are more likely to be in work and earn more than non-graduates. It also found that ten years after finishing university, graduates earned an average of over 25% more than non-graduates of the same age.

Although financial worries are a reality that aren’t going to disappear, nobody should feel like they don’t have access to higher-education because of their socio-economic background. It’s this unfortunate attitude that has helped to create a two-tier education system with students from poorer families less likely to pursue degrees – but the rise of degree-apprenticeships could help change this.

Degree-apprenticeships may be the solution

Degree apprenticeships allow students to do paid work at an accredited company, but also study for a management-related degree alongside it. Many high-profile firms across the UK, including M&S, Nestle, Rolls-Royce and Barclays, have signed up for the government backed scheme.

A student doing a degree-apprenticeship with Nestle spoke glowingly about the opportunity, “I find it incredible that at 21, compared to my friends who did go to uni, I’ll have not only a degree but also a professional status.”

Another student that made the decision to take up a degree apprenticeship because she was worried about getting into debt, saying “It was a worrying thought that I would be paying that off for the rest of my working life…The apprenticeship sounded a better option.”

With Government pledging to create 3 million degree-apprenticeships by 2020, this could be the change that sees working-class students have equal access to higher-education and finally puts an end to two-tier education.

At GT Scholars we believe that everybody should have access to the education that they want, no matter their background. That’s why we charge means-tested fees, to ensure that young people from lower income homes can access our programmes. To find out more about how we support young people through our courses, workshops and programmes, register your interest by visiting www.gtscholars.org/register-your-interest

In The Know: Your child’s future!

In The Know: Your child’s future!

Events In The Know University What's new? Young people

We hope you’re having a wonderful week! Today we are focussing on university and beyond as we bring you several events and programmes that can give your child a head start on their future!

University of London – Taster Courses
The Taster Course Programme provides students in Year 12 (aged 16-17) with a taste of what life at a university in London is like.  Your child would experience real lectures, gain insight into the additional facilities available and meet students from across the UK. All the taster courses are free to attend and your child can choose a course from a variety of subjects taking place at the numerous participating universities. Courses range from voice and drama, to medicine and nursing, to computing and business. Find our more on their website.

Bank of England – Scholarship Programme
In conjunction with the Windsor Fellowship, the Bank of England are offering students aged 17-18 a scholarship programme that can financially support them whilst at university. Aside from receiving a considerable amount of money to cover living expenses, your child would also receive mentoring and paid summer internships. Your child must fit certain criteria to qualify for this and the application deadline is Sunday 26th February, so head over to the website to find out more and apply.

Sky – Tech Insight Evening
On Wednesday 1st March, Sky are offering young women aged 16-24 the chance to come and find out more about Technology in a Broadcast Centre. If your daughter is enthusiastic and has a keen interest in tech then this is a perfect event to learn more about what a career in technology entails and what apprenticeships and opportunities are available to her. No experience is necessary so encourage your daughter to sign up today!

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme that focuses on growth mindset and reaching potential. The programme includes tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-16. We aim to help you achieve your aspirations and get into top universities and competitive careers. To find out more, browse our website and get in touch with us: https://gtscholars.org/register-your-interest

7 things to think about when choosing a university

7 things to think about when choosing a university

Private tuition Private tutors University What's new? Young people

University can be one of the most exciting and rewarding times in your life. But before you get there, there is the challenge of choosing the right university.

I went through the application process a few years ago and understand how tough and stressful it can be. So here are some tips to help the aspiring university student make the right decision

1. Take your time: Choosing the right university is important. Remember you will be studying there for, most likely, three years. Don’t leave the process to the last minute. Deciding where you want to study can be tough, so give yourself the luxury of time to think it over. It may be worth thinking about this as early as Year 9 or 10. Click here to read a blog about achieving your goals by starting with the end in mind.

2. Look at league tables: League tables can be a good indicator as to the overall rating and reputation of a university as well as the quality of any given course. There are a number of respected league tables published every year, such as The Complete University Guide, the Guardian University Guide and The Times Good University Guide. Also, note that different universities excel at different subjects, so make sure you research the reputation of your potential universities in regards to your chosen subject.

3. Do your research! Make sure you research your potential universities thoroughly. University websites usually contain a lot of detail about the institution and its history and values. You can also read the university’s prospectus online or order one to arrive by post. Some universities will require that you apply earlier than the usual deadline, other universities operate a collegiate system and expect you to choose a college when applying. Some universities expect you to take an additional entrance exam before being accepted on the course. Remember that the more you know about your potential university, the more confident you will be that you are making the right choice.

4. Attend open days. Make sure you attend a handful of open days, so that you have some comparisons. Going to visit a university is the only way you will get a true feel for what life will be like there. The day I stepped onto the campus at the University of Kent, was the day I knew where I wanted to study and spend the next three years of my life. At an open day you get a chance to meet and talk to staff and students and also tour the university campus. Statistics and league tables tell us something, but the first-hand experience of a visit will help paint a more detailed picture of what a university has to offer.

5. Lifestyle & location: Don’t forget to think about location when choosing a university. Ask yourself what kind of lifestyle you want outside of your studies? Some may favour living in a big city with a vibrant and varied nightlife. Others may prefer a low key, relaxed environment. You may also want to consider how far away from home you are prepared to live. Some students choose to live at home with their family during their time at university, others want to live within a short distance from home and others are quite happy to move much further away.

6. Societies, Sports & Extracurricular activities: There are usually hundreds of societies in each university and some universities have world-renowned facilities to support these activities eg. Sports at Loughborough University. You won’t be spending all your time studying so if there’s an activity that you enjoy and want to continue at university, it may be worth looking into the university that will support you with this. If you don’t have an extra-curricular that you are particularly interested in, it may be worth looking at the university list of societies to have a think about the kinds of activities that you would want to take part in, in your free time.

7. What else is on offer: Some universities have really good exchange programmes where you can study abroad as part of your course. Some universities have an excellent careers fair and a career centre to support you with getting internships and finding a graduate job. Some universities have really good bursaries which could reduce the cost of your course. Others allow you to take credits as part of your degree so you can study Biology and take some credits in Music (if that’s the sort of thing you’re looking for!). Wherever you choose to study, make sure that you look into any other added benefits as this will really help with your decision making.

We hope this is helpful to anyone that’s thinking about going to university in the next couple of years. For more hints and tips on universities and careers, visit the GT Scholars blog www.gtscholars.org/blog

 

Choosing a university course? 5 tips from a recent graduate to help you make the right choice

Choosing a university course? 5 tips from a recent graduate to help you make the right choice

Growth mindset Private tuition Private tutors University What's new?

So you’ve been working really hard preparing for university, you’re pretty sure you’ll get the grades and maybe you even know which university you’ll go to… but there’s a huge decision you need to make. Which university course will you study?

According to UCAS, there are 37,000 undergraduate courses at over 370 universities across the UK. There are many factors that that need to be taken into consideration when deciding the course that is right for you. We’ve written a list of 5 things you should consider when choosing your future degree course.

  1. Choose something you are passionate about

This tip may seem obvious but I can’t stress this enough. Remember that you’ll be spending at least three years studying your chosen subject. If you aren’t passionate about your subject then you’ll likely find it much harder to motivate yourself and you won’t enjoy the experience. A mixture of passion for your subject and hard work will stand you in great stead for your time at university.

  1. Look at the course content

It’s essential to research the specific details of your course. You may find that one university has modules in your subject that interest you far more than the modules in the same subject at another university. Be sure to look at the second and third year modules, as well as the first year as this will give a good indication of the direction of your course.

  1. Check league tables & specialities

League tables can be a good indicator as to the quality of any given course. There are a number of respected league tables published every year, such as Also, note that different universities excel at different subjects, so make sure you research the reputation of your potential universities in regards to your chosen subject.

  1. Think about your career direction

  It may seem a little early to think about career decisions but keep in mind the paths your course opens up for you. It is an obvious point, but some professions need people with degrees in specific subjects, so if you know what you want to do later in life, you may want to tailor your qualification to that profession. If you are not sure what you want to do in later life, don’t panic. A degree opens up a lot more paths than it closes, and you are not limited to working in a career which directly relates to your degree.   

Look into degrees that offer something unique: There are a large number of degrees in the UK that offer unique opportunities such as sandwich placements where you spend a year working in a company, usually between your second and third year. Other degrees offer add on credits so that you can graduate with a double degree or you can graduate with a degree plus a language. Another popular choice is a degree with the opportunity to study abroad for a year. This can be an excellent opportunity to meet new travel the world, meet new people and complete your degree at the same time.

We hope this gives you a good idea of how to get started with your search for a degree course. For more hints and tips on universities and careers, visit the GT Scholars blog www.gtscholars.org/blog

 

The world of free online education

The world of free online education

Post 16 Resources University What's new?

Next month is the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web. In the last 25 years, we have seen posted letters turn into e-mail and witnessed the birth of social media. But for students and parents, the internet also brought something far more useful: free online education.

Private tuition can bring about huge benefits to young people but what about independent learning? There is a wealth of research supporting the benefits of teaching students to be self-starters and helping students develop an intrinsic motivation for learning  – learning because they simply enjoy it.

Thankfully there are many places where young people can start to develop their independent learning journey. There are thousands of websites that can provide 24/7 access to a whole world of learning and the best part is that they’re free to use.

Free online education for young children

Crickweb offers fun and interactive educational games for children from their early years right through to Key Stage 2. Subjects covered include Maths, Science, Literacy and History.

If you’re focusing on providing a world education for your children, then National Geographic Kids offers a fun space for children to play games and videos that will teach them more about the natural environment.

Free online education for secondary school students

For children revising for secondary school exams, the BBC Bitesize website has some of the most in-depth revision aids and practice quizzes online. Now with a free app for tablets and smartphones, students have the option to benefit from Key Stage 1 Maths tuition all the way to GCSE level Science tuition.

Another popular free online education provider is S-Cools. Referred to as ‘The Revision Website’, S-Cools not only provides revision guides for GCSE and A-Level subjects, but they also have a forum space for students to group together and tutor each other as peers.

For students focusing on English literature, SparkNotes and EnglishBiz together offer comprehensive study notes on curriculum literature. Perfect for keeping an analytical mind on nights when your child isn’t with their English tutor!

Free online education for all ages

Perhaps you yourself want to study a new language or your child needs to revise their history? Memrise provides free online courses in a wide range of subjects presented as quizzes and games, which also make them fun to complete. Whether you use the website online or via the app, you get to track your progress as you go and pick up at home later where you left off earlier in the library.

If yourself or your child learns best via video courses then the Khan Academy is one of the best free education tools out there. The courses are based on sub topics within Science, History, etc., which gives great in-depth understanding to a topic without the need for private tuition. A similar website that offers free online education in advanced modular topics is FutureLearn.

Further sites that offer free and in-depth learning courses include EdX (which also offers a paid opportunity to earn recognised qualifications) and Udemy. Udemy also offers paid courses, but there is a huge library of free courses on offer on a wide range of topics from business marketing to world history.

The GT Scholars programme aims to help young people develop an intrinsic motivation for learning. We teach young people how to become better learners so that they can attain excellent grades across all subjects.

Why not subscribe to ‘In the know’? This is our weekly newsletter for parents. You’ll get updates on events and academic and career opportunities for 11-16 year olds. Click here to subscribe: www.gtscholars.org/contact-us

7 things to think about when choosing a university

7 things to think about when choosing a university

Post 16 University What's new?

University can be one of the most exciting and rewarding times in your life. But before you get there, there is the challenge of choosing the right university.

I went through the application process a few years ago and understand how tough and stressful it can be. So here are some tips to help the aspiring university student make the right decision

  • Take your time: Choosing the right university is important. Remember you will be studying there for, most likely, three years. Don’t leave the process to the last minute. Deciding where you want to study can be tough, so give yourself the luxury of time to think it over. It may be worth thinking about this as early as Year 9 or 10. Click here to read a blog about achieving your goals by starting with the end in mind.
  • Look at league tables: League tables can be a good indicator as to the overall rating and reputation of a university as well as the quality of any given course. There are a number of respected league tables published every year, such as The Complete University Guide, the Guardian University Guide and The Times Good University Guide. Also, note that different universities excel at different subjects, so make sure you research the reputation of your potential universities in regards to your chosen subject.
  • Do your research! University websites contain a lot of detail about the institution, its history and values. You can also read the university’s prospectus online or order one to arrive by post. Some universities will require you to apply earlier than the usual deadline, other universities operate a collegiate system and expect you to choose a college when applying. Some universities expect you to take an additional entrance exam before being accepted on the course. Remember that the more you know about your potential university, the more prepared you will be with your application.
  • Attend open days. Make sure you attend a handful of open days, so that you have some comparisons. Going to visit a university is the only way you will get a true feel for what life will be like there. The day I stepped onto the campus at the University of Kent, was the day I knew where I wanted to study and spend the next three years of my life. At an open day you get a chance to meet and talk to staff and students and also tour the university campus. Statistics and league tables tell us something, but the first-hand experience of a visit will help paint a more detailed picture of what a university has to offer.
  • Lifestyle & location: Don’t forget to think about location when choosing a university. Ask yourself what kind of lifestyle you want outside of your studies? Some may favour living in a big city with a vibrant and varied nightlife. Others may prefer a low key, relaxed environment. You may also want to consider how far away from home you are prepared to live. Some students choose to live at home with their family during their time at university, others want to live within a short distance from home and others are quite happy to move much further away.
  • Societies, Sports & Extracurricular activities: There are usually hundreds of societies in each university and some universities have world-renowned facilities to support these activities eg. Sports at Loughborough University. You won’t be spending all your time studying so if there’s an activity that you enjoy and want to continue at university, it may be worth looking into the university that will support you with this. If you don’t have an extra-curricular that you are particularly interested in, it may be worth looking at the university list of societies to have a think about the kinds of activities that you would want to take part in, in your free time.
  • What else is on offer: Some universities have really good exchange programmes where you can study abroad as part of your course. Some universities have an excellent careers fair and a career centre to support you with getting internships and finding a graduate job. Some universities have really good bursaries which could reduce the cost of your course. Others allow you to take credits as part of your degree so you can study Biology and take some credits in Music (if that’s the sort of thing you’re looking for!). Wherever you choose to study, make sure that you look into any other added benefits as this will really help with your decision making.

We hope this is helpful to anyone that’s thinking about going to university in the next couple of years. For more hints and tips on universities and careers, visit the GT Scholars blog www.gtscholars.org/blog

Choosing a university course? 5 tips from a recent graduate to help you make the right choice

Choosing a university course? 5 tips from a recent graduate to help you make the right choice

Post 16 University What's new?

So you’ve been working really hard preparing for university, you’re pretty sure you’ll get the grades and maybe you even know which university you’ll go to… but there’s a huge decision you’ll need to make. Which university course will you study?

According to UCAS, there are 37,000 undergraduate courses at over 370 universities across the UK. There are many factors that that need to be taken into consideration when deciding the course that is right for you. We’ve written a list of 5 things you should consider when choosing your future degree course.

1. Choose something you are passionate about

This tip may seem obvious but I can’t stress this enough. Remember that you’ll be spending at least three years studying your chosen subject. If you aren’t passionate about your subject then you’ll likely find it much harder to motivate yourself and you won’t enjoy the experience. A mixture of passion for your subject and hard work will stand you in great stead for your time at university.

2. Look at the course content

It’s essential to research the specific details of your course. You may find that one university has modules in your subject that interest you far more than the modules in the same subject at another university. Be sure to look at the second and third year modules, as well as the first year as this will give a good indication of the direction of your course.

3. Check league tables & specialities

League tables can be a good indicator as to the quality of any given course. There are a number of respected league tables published every year, such as The Complete University Guide, the Guardian University Guide and The Times/Sunday Times Good University Guide. Also, note that different universities excel at different subjects, so make sure you research the reputation of your potential universities in regards to your chosen subject.

4. Think about your career direction

It may seem a little early to think about career decisions but keep in mind the paths your course opens up for you. It is an obvious point, but some professions need people with degrees in specific subjects, so if you know what you want to do later in life, you may want to tailor your qualification to that profession. If you are not sure what you want to do in later life, don’t panic. A degree opens up a lot more paths than it closes, and you are not limited to working in a career which directly relates to your degree.

5. Look into degrees that offer something unique

There are a large number of degree courses in the UK that offer unique opportunities such as sandwich placements where you spend a year working in a company, usually between your second and third year. Other degrees offer credits so that you can graduate with a degree in more than one subjet eg Music degree with Spanish. Another popular choice is a degree with the opportunity to study abroad for a year. This can be an excellent opportunity to travel the world, meet new people and complete your degree at the same time.

We hope this gives you a good idea of how to get started with your search for a degree course. For more hints and tips on universities and careers, visit the GT Scholars blog www.gtscholars.org/blog

Extra-curricular activities to boost your personal statement or CV

Extra-curricular activities to boost your personal statement or CV

Post 16 University What's new? Young people

Your teenage years can be consumed by getting the grades for work or University. But it doesn’t all have to be about studying! Taking part in extracurricular activities not only breaks up the school week but also gives you an opportunity to show how gifted and talented you are to future schools and employers.

The GT Scholars programme knows this, which is why we love providing our skill building days and encouraging you to develop transferrable skills in leadership, time management and working as a team. But if you’re looking for even more ways to boost your personal statement or CV here are five extracurricular activities examples that employees love!

1. Language activities

Travel is more affordable than ever and many companies work internationally, which makes language skills hugely appealing to prospective employers.

As for adding language skills to your personal statement, what’s more impressive than showing Universities that you personally managed your time and studies to learn another language?

2. Sports

Sports are a great way to boost your personal statement or CV because so often they are also fun ways to hang out with friends. Why do they look so good? Engaging in sports outside of school shows your ability to work as a team, motivate yourself to improve and be reliable enough to turn up to training sessions.

3. Volunteering

Showing that you are willing to use your free time to help others and be depended on not only reflects your innate interest in the welfare of others but can also offer a wide range of skills in business and events. Volunteering in the community could give you valuable experience in anything from management of others, team work, money-handling, communication and event organisation.

4. Tutoring

Acting as a private tutor to those younger than you implies strong leadership and support skills. Tutoring others in school subjects also helps you understand those subjects better, which will then come across in your confidence of that subject as well as showcasing your ability to coach others and work for a shared goal rather than just a personal one.

5. Creative experience

With so much emphasis on grades in school, you can forget to spend time being creative. But employees and Universities love to see time spent on creative activities! Whether it’s making and selling arts and crafts, producing short videos for Youtube with friends or writing for a student website, each of these skills shows your ability to take initiative, think outside the box and present valuable skills in business and IT.

A really simple example of this is from my own years at Secondary school when I decided to make tote bags out of left over fabric and then sold them through a Facebook page. Straight away I could add business and online marketing experience to my personal statement for University!

So there you have five extra-curricular activities that look good for University or your CV. And the best part is that you can have a great time with friends who have similar interests!

The GT Scholars Programme is an after-school programme for young people aged 11-16. Scholars receive support through tutoring, mentoring, enrichment and skill-building activities that are specifically designed to improve their grades at school, help them get them into top universities and help them enter competitive careers.

To find out more about the GT Scholars Programme and arrange a consultation with a member of our team visit click here