An interview with one of our fantastic volunteer mentors – Nileema Patel

An interview with one of our fantastic volunteer mentors – Nileema Patel

Mentoring Volunteer interviews What's new?

Please tell us a bit about yourself
Many years ago, I used to teach primary school students as a volunteer and that was a very rewarding experience. Unfortunately, due to increasing time commitments elsewhere I couldn’t continue along with that. Recently, when things had settled back down, I realised I wanted to do something to help young people again and came across GT Scholars not long after I started looking for opportunities to do so. It’s been really nice to help out through mentoring, which has been completely different, yet just as rewarding, experience when compared to teaching. Outside of volunteering, I work in healthcare and enjoy baking and reading in my spare time.

How did you first hear about GT Scholars?
I came across GT Scholars through an online search engine. I was looking for an opportunity that would allow me to give more to my community, particularly in a way that would help young people. I went on your website and got a good feeling about the mission, which very much aligns with my values. Reading about Temi and her background was really inspiring and it gave me confidence in GT Scholars as a committed and genuine social enterprise. I got in touch through the online application form and it all went from there really.

What goals have you helped your scholar to achieve?
So this term we focused on public speaking a lot; how to feel more confident and assured. We worked on different techniques to apply before a speaking assignment to see what helped and felt most natural. You know, just simple things like practising a lot, practising with different people, trying out tips from the famous Ted Talk on confidence by Amy Cuddy.

A recurring theme during our sessions has also been about career choices, university choices and progressing to sixth-form. These are longer-term goals that are useful to start thinking about early on and I look forward to helping Erica achieve them as we move into the next term.

What qualities does Erica have that makes her a good mentee?
Erica is a wonderful mentee. She’s punctual, listens well and is forthcoming about topics of interest or any issues that she’s worried about. She’s organised as well and very good at managing her time and extracurricular activities. I think all of those skills really make her a good mentee as well as a good student, and I think this will translate very well professionally, too, in whatever area she decides to go into eventually.

Why do you think mentoring is valuable to young people?
I think the most valuable aspect of mentoring is the confidence that a young person might gain from it. Being a young person, particularly in a big city like London, it can be difficult to have self-confidence. You don’t have a lot of experience and everything seems new and sometimes unapproachable, particularly in areas such as applying to university. So I think the support that comes from mentoring can be extremely valuable in terms of validating a young person’s ideas and goals. Practically, mentoring is a great way to highlight opportunities to get involved in.

What challenges did you face while mentoring your scholar?
For me, the first session was probably the most challenging because I did not have a lot of mentoring experience. However, I found that GT Scholars had sheets to prepare mentors which I read beforehand and which were very helpful in giving me an idea of how to build rapport and understand what the priorities of mentoring are.

I also tried to think back to times I have been mentored in the past, informally and formally. I thought about what made my mentors so good and then tried to embody that in my role as a mentor.

What did you enjoy most about volunteering and mentoring?
I really enjoyed getting to know the mentee, as well as her mother. You know Erica, she’s already a very bright, ambitious person, on the lookout for opportunities to support her goals and a little bit of guidance. I enjoy being a sounding board for her, hearing about her goals and being able to guide her as she achieves them. I particularly like that, over the sessions, I am able to see her progress, and get to hear feedback from her and her mother about how our sessions are impacting her social and academic development.

What have you gained from being a volunteer mentor with GT Scholars?
It’s been really nice to be able to pass along some of the things I have learnt along the way to an enthusiastic young person who might be able to benefit from that advice. Building relationships with the team at GT Scholars, my mentee and her mother, has been personally very rewarding and the whole process has a been wonderful way to give back.

 

Spotlight on one of our young scholars – Ladan

Spotlight on one of our young scholars – Ladan

Growth mindset Private tuition Success stories What's new? Young people

Please tell us a bit about yourself
I’m fifteen and am in Year 10. I love subjects like history as I’ve always enjoyed learning about interesting events such as The Cold War since I was little. I also enjoy learning science, especially experiments.

What does being on the programme mean to you?
I see being on the programme as a really lucky opportunity to be able to develop myself as a whole, not just as a student but as someone with a more flexible mindset that can approach most tasks with an open mind.

How has GT Scholars helped you to improve yourself?
They’ve helped me think more about my future and how I can strive to improve what’s really important to me such as my academics or way of thinking. I’ve seen a great improvement in maths and I’ve moved up from foundation grade to higher grade and also reached my target grade. With mentoring, I’ve grown a lot and I’m more confident than before and my mentor has helped me to choose subjects that align with my interests.

What were your tutor and mentor like? How did this help?
My tutor Janet has helped me improve significantly in maths which honestly, is a subject that I’ve struggled with but now I enjoy the subject and am improving greatly. My mentor Sulina was really kind and I managed to learn about her career and more about the vast educational opportunities in London. For example, I used to be reluctant about IB because of all the stigma around it but as I learnt more about it I think I am more open to applying to IB next year.

Have your grades changed since being on the programme? Did you improve in any of the subjects at school?
My grades have really improved in Maths, classwork comes more easily to me now, so my teacher often gives me more challenging tasks and it’s lead to me achieving higher grades in a subject I was once not doing so well in.

What was the best thing that your tutor taught you?
My tutor helped me learn more effective time management skills. She helped me put into place more concrete methods in my exams, like the mark a minute technique that really helped me, especially since I practised it during our sessions and in homework.

How will you apply what you have learnt during the programme to your future?
My dislike for maths has honestly gone down and I genuinely enjoy the subject sometimes, so I think the likelihood that I may choose economics as an A-Level has increased.

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Arash Khosravi

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Arash Khosravi

Volunteer interviews Volunteers What's new?

Tell me a little bit about you and what got you to where you are today?
I went through school and after that, I did Economics at A-level and then studied Economics full time at UCL. During my time at UCL, I was the president of the UCL branch of the charity Team Up. After graduation, I was offered a job at the Bank of England where I worked as a Data Analyst.

What made you decide to become a volunteer tutor?
I really feel like I want to give back to society and give back to people that are in a less fortunate position than I am, through no fault of their own, and help them achieve their full potential. I did some informal tutoring a few years ago and I got really good feedback. That made me think and I then decided to take my strengths and use them to help people that really need the support. Since volunteering at UCL, I was trying to find other opportunities to volunteer that could fit in with my work schedule. I find that tutoring is a really good option and that I can make a real difference in a young person’s life.

What did you enjoy most about tutoring your scholar?
What I enjoyed most was really seeing the development of my scholar throughout the 12 week term. I think the highlight for me was in week 4 when I logged into Skype for our session and my scholar said: ‘’Sir, sir you know the thing we’ve done with the area of the square? I tried it in class and my teacher said I got the question right!” She was really chuffed about it and that was great to hear. I think engaging with the scholar and building a good relationship is what I’ve enjoyed most. I was very lucky to be matched with someone who is really engaged and ready to learn.

What challenges have you helped your scholar to face?
What I found at the beginning of this term in my scholar was the fact that she was doubting herself. I think the challenge was to reinforce the knowledge she already had and building her confidence. In the beginning, I would ask a question and she would attempt to solve 60% of the question but wouldn’t have the confidence to work through the remaining 40%. She would then say she did not know how to do it. I focussed on building her confidence and to say to herself, I do know how to do it and I won’t give up. It’s really great to see how much her maths has developed and improved.

What goals have you helped your scholar to achieve?
I think a good example of one of our goals would be the mock test my scholar had coming up. A week before the mock test we did two tutoring sessions so I could help her prepare for the test. After the test, she came back and said that a lot of the work we revised did come up in the test and she really felt confident answering them. We also set up goals for some of the topics she felt a bit weaker in and although she was struggling with it earlier on in the term she was able to tackle them after a few week’s sessions.

Why do you think tutoring is valuable to young people?
Because I feel that students at school have a wide range of abilities and are at different levels. I don’t think that the modern skill system can factor that in with a class of 30 students, with different abilities and learning styles. Some young people need additional support and a lot of them don’t have the opportunity to get 1-to-1 support and can fall behind. I think tutoring can help fill that gap between school and home. Free tutoring is great to bridge the gap between young people who can afford private tutoring and those who cant.

Do you have a message for young people?
I would say they should keep working, keep trying and keep persevering with whatever they want to do in life. There’s no one path to get you where you want to go. Be who you are and don’t try to be anyone else. And with that mindset try things and really persevere. Like with the GT Scholar Programme, even if you don’t get it results initially, keep trying and pushing forward and towards where you want to go.

How important has support been in getting you to where you are today?
My dad is a maths lecturer, I could not get away from maths as a young person (laughs). Until about GCSE I was rubbish at maths, I used to get 40%. I think it was because I wanted to get away from maths because my dad will always be talking about it. At that age, I did not realise the importance of it. Until my dad sat me down and got me to engage and focus and made me realise the importance of it. In terms of other subjects, I did not have formal tutors but had support from my peers and family that helped me a lot.

What have you gained from volunteering with GT Scholars?
I feel like I gained a lot of confidence. I was a bit nervous before my first session because I see it as a real responsibility and duty to help a young person on their journey with mathematics. I really wanted to do a good job and make an impact on my scholar’s life. Having my scholar come back by the fourth session saying how she benefited from our sessions had really boosted my confidence. I think there are a lot of children out there that don’t see their own potential and it’s really opened my eyes to that. I have also gained a great relationship with my scholar and we even joke around during sessions sometimes.

Would you recommend becoming a tutor with GT Scholars?
Definitely. I think the whole process is really good and I gained a lot from the experience. For a tutor to be able to come in and really feel the positive impact made with a scholar and really seeing the journey you’re both going through during the 12 weeks is just amazing. The programme is really great for those scholars who are at average or just below, to give them that extra boost they need. Volunteering as a tutor is a nice way to start volunteering, whether it’s your first time or if you’re an experienced volunteer. I definitely recommend it in terms of it being a great way to volunteer and help young people.

An Interview with a Parent: ”The online maths tutoring sessions have definitely helped her excel in maths. ”

An Interview with a Parent: ”The online maths tutoring sessions have definitely helped her excel in maths. ”

Parent Spotlight What's new?

We had the pleasure of interviewing a parent of one of the scholars on the Bright Ambitions Programme this term. It was great to hear about her experience with the programme and to find out if being on the programme made any positive impact on her daughter’s life.

How did you find out about GT Scholars?
We first got introduced to the programme when Laura’s religious (RE) teacher passed on information about a GT Scholars Workshop called the Career Insight: Pre Launch Event. Laura was very interested in going and shared the information with me. Just days before, my friend and I had a conversation about career choices and about the fact that most young people do not have enough in-depth information on different careers these days. After she attended the workshop she was fascinated by the different career choices available to her. This workshop was a real eye-opener for my daughter and after the workshop, she decided she was not completely set on pursuing a career as an architect and wanted to look more into a career in business. Since then, she’s been thinking about a career where she can combine her love for art and her interest in business.

Have you seen any positive change in your daughter since she joined the Bright Ambitions programme?
I’ve definitely seen a lot of improvement in her maths. It’s great because I cannot help her that much with maths since it’s not one of my strong areas. It was important for her to fill in the gaps on areas that she’s been struggling with. Maths is an important subject for my daughter because she’ll definitely need it for the career paths she’s interested in. Since having her regular online tutoring and mentoring sessions she’s become more confident. She recently completed her exams and we are very pleased with the results. My daughter has moved up an entire set in Maths and she is also one of the top two students of her class!

Do you feel that it was worth enrolling Laura to the Bright Ambitions programme?
I would say yes, it was definitely worth it. The online maths tutoring sessions have definitely helped her excel in maths and the mentoring sessions have helped build her confidence and made her more open-minded.

As a parent, how did you find interacting with the tutors and mentors?
I am very pleased with Derek, he is a very nice guy and he’s absolutely wonderful as a tutor. Our mentor, Rachel is also a wonderful lady and my daughter gets on well with her. She really guided her on finding her own career path and keeping her options open.

What do you like about the fact that tutoring is done online?
What I like most about online tutoring is the convenience of it. It eliminates the stress of having to travel to a location for every tutoring session and my daughter can enjoy her tutoring sessions in the comfort of our home. The fact that there is a dedicated tutor that works with her to reach her goals is also great.

Would you recommend GT Scholars to other parents out there looking for a tutoring and mentoring programme?
Yes, I would because I think it works out and is worth it in the end. The results are great!

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Janet Cheney

An interview with one of our volunteer online tutors – Janet Cheney

What's new?

What have you been up to since your last volunteer spotlight interview?
The main thing has been moving down to a house in Devon. Online tutoring has been really important for me because I do move around a lot. My parents live up in Lancashire and my daughters live in London, so I’m constantly travelling between these places to be able to see everybody. Being able to still tutor no matter where I am, has really fitted in extremely well and I find it very rewarding

This term you’ve been matched with Ladan. What did you enjoy most about tutoring her?
Ladan is an absolute delight! She’s so enthusiastic and also so eager to learn and doesn’t give up. She keeps persisting till she gets something and that’s just wonderful. She’s done some end of year tests in school recently and some of the questions that she showed me asking me: ‘’Have I done this right?’’, were perfect. I think by doing things and showing she can do it gives her more confidence. It’s great working with her, she is on top of everything.

What goals have you helped your scholar to achieve?
Her main target, right from the beginning, was to move up to higher GCSE work. She was on foundation stream. Her predicted grade from school is a grade 6 which is just over the boundary of foundation. But I can understand that perhaps she has struggled a bit but I do think a lot of it is confidence and that’s what I’ve been aiming to do, is really build her confidence up. I think by having a bit more time in the tutorial to really understand topics, she then has more confidence to apply them. We’ve spent a lot of time going through exam style questions because they can be very different from class exercises. You know, even if you’ve got the basic techniques, actually learning to understand the question, turn it into a math problem and solving it, that’s what we have focused a lot of attention on.

She is now doing these steps herself without me having to prompt her. So I think that’s made a big difference and I am pleased to hear that she has now been moved up to a higher stream. We’ve done a bit of work on the higher level, you know, just to show her what it’s like and to start looking at how she has to apply and use several techniques together to solve a problem and I think that is quite a big step.

What challenges at the start of your relationship that was clear to you and that she’s made a massive improvement on?
When I started with her in February, she had just taken an exam at school. I think if she’s done particularly well in that she might have been able to go up to a higher stream then, but there were some areas she found challenging. We focussed a lot on basic manipulation and fractions and she is definitely more confident about that. My strategy was that I thought she could gain a lot of points in quite a lot of areas by paying attention to the basics.

It was rewarding going through recent questions and she took me through what she did. The way she modelled her answers were good, the same way we did it together, and it showed that she had learned and that she can now apply it herself. Speaking to her mother, she had feedback from school that she’s improved her confidence as well. She did another end of year test, she said that she felt a lot more confident in it than her previous test and indeed, she has now been able to go up to the higher level.

Why do you think tutoring is valuable to young people?
I think the one to one aspect is particularly important, being able to concentrate on the points that they are struggling with. I think it must be very difficult in class for a teacher to cover everything. In a tutoring session, you can focus on the aspect that your student is struggling with and so the tutoring is more targeted. The focus on doing exam style questions is very useful for most students. I will make sure that the student is sound on their basic technique, but then move on to applying it successfully. Also working with a student to develop a methodology which works for them.

I made it very clear, I can’t help you to solve every question, you’ve got to find ways of doing that yourself. So you’ll need to be able to read a
question and take out of it what you need to find out what the maths problem is. I think that’s something again that must be quite hard in class to do. I’m sure they do try and do that but again, probably different styles suit different students. You know some will find they do better in a certain way. Some like a pictorial view, some like to have a diagram or a tabular view. You can be more flexible if you are doing it one to one.

You’ve been a volunteer tutor with us for a couple of terms, what made you decide to continue volunteering this term?
I thoroughly enjoyed it last year, particularly because it fits in with my lifestyle. I have done quite a bit of tutoring in school over the last few years with another organisation, but unfortunately, it is all based in London and you have to commit to doing it there every week and I can’t always do that, so this fits much better.

The other thing I enjoy about how you are set up is that you have a relationship with the parent, which again, I did not have when I went into school. You can set the homework and they can help with the mechanics of that. Also when you have parents involved they will encourage their children and I think it does make a big difference. I had a student that needed a bit of encouragement and his parents were there to do that. When he got his results he was very pleased, he got his grade 5, and his parents were also delighted, this was very rewarding for me as it is nice to be appreciated and it has also given me the confidence to continue with the online tutoring.

What is the one quality of Ladan that stands out above all others that make her a good tutee?
I think it is her determination. She always wants to do more, she’s not content to just work at a certain level, she wants to do better all the time. I think she’s very mature in that way, certainly in comparison with a lot of students I’ve dealt with. She’s mature for her age. At the end of the day, they have to go away and they have to achieve on their own. I have no doubt that she will do well.

What have you gained from volunteering with GT Scholars?
It’s a sense of achievement and I also enjoy working with young people. We can have a laugh about things and it’s a nice routine, once a week. The job I had before I retired was very demanding and when I finished doing that I wanted to do something which was more for me. I’ve always enjoyed doing Maths and helped my own children through their GCSE and A levels and I enjoyed helping them. I just wanted to carry on really and it is an important part of my life that I get a lot of enjoyment and fulfilment out of.

Do you feel that you’ve got support from the GT Scholars team? What was your experience like?
It’s been very good. I think the way it’s been set up, you know, with the weekly reporting, it’s good to have that, it’s a discipline that I wouldn’t necessarily do myself, to be honest, but it is good to have as a back up to go back and being able to see what you’ve done. Also setting the end of term assessments, that’s useful, although sometimes it can be difficult for the students to fit them in because it takes quite a long doing them, but I think if you’re flexible about it, it is not really a problem. The initial training I had was also useful and I also find the online whiteboard generally pretty good.

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Are you InQUIZitive!?

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Are you InQUIZitive!?

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

The weekend is finally here and we hope you had a fantastic week! We know #VolunteersWeek is over, but we couldn’t let it go by without giving all our awesome volunteers a fun activity to get involved in! Read on to find out more and see which other exciting things you can be a part of this month!

What’s your Volunteer Persona?

In our last newsletter we mentioned we had something in store for all our volunteers and it’s finally here! We’ve come up with a fun, quick and easy quiz to help you find out more about your Volunteer Persona! (Yes – that’s a thing!) We’d love to know your thoughts on it – you can find the quiz here!

Could you volunteer at next week’s workshop?

Our next workshop, SpeakUp: Find Your Voice, Change The World, will be taking place on Saturday 22nd June 2019 from 10am-4pm at Goldsmiths University. This workshop will be all about public speaking and presentation skills and engaging young people in activism and making a difference in London. If you’d like to lend a helping hand as an event volunteer, please get in touch with me and I will contact you with further details.

State of London Debate
If you haven’t already heard, on Thursday 27th June 2019, the Mayor of London will be speaking at the State of London Debate. This free event will be an open forum for all Londoners to engage with each other and join the conversation about important issues with the Mayor. The debate is taking place at The O2 in London and you can register and find out more details here!

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Volunteer this summer!

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Volunteer this summer!

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

We hope you’ve had an amazing week and are as excited as we are to be stepping into the first summer weekend! It’s also the start of Volunteers’ Week, and this week’s newsletter includes some great volunteer opportunities you can get involved in. Curious to find out how? Read on for more details!

Something new is heading your way!

We’re so grateful for the support we get from our volunteers and it’s volunteers just like you that make a huge difference in the lives of our young people. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been cooking up some ideas of a fun activity for Volunteers Week and beyond. We’ve been working on something that all our volunteers can participate in and we’ll be sharing further details with you in the coming week – So keep an eye out for what we have in store!

Invite us to Speak!
As you know, we’re all about creating opportunities for young people, especially those from low-income backgrounds, to succeed in school and beyond. We’d love to share more about what we do with people so that we can increase our reach and continue to help young people in need! If you know of any forums or speaking engagements you think we could be a part of to make this happen, then please get in touch with me to chat further.

Write a Blog Post!

If you’re looking for a quick and easy way to volunteer, you can join us as a guest blogger for our blog!  The blog posts are a great way for you to share your thoughts with our scholars and parents about education, social mobility and potential careers for young people. If you’d like to be a guest blogger, you can get in touch with me or get further details here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – New opportunities to look out for!

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – New opportunities to look out for!

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

We hope your week has been a fantastic one! We are definitely excited to hear the news that Oxford University is taking progressive steps to widen access to disadvantaged students and we hope to see more impactful changes like this take place across the education sector! We’d love to hear your thoughts on this! We also have some exciting news to share on what’s been happening here at GT Scholars – read on to find out more!

 

Coding Workshop Facilitators needed
We’re looking for workshop facilitators with a background in coding and computer science to run our coding workshops coming up this year. Our coding workshops help young people to learn new skills for a 21st-century career and we are looking forward to helping even more young people this year. So if you know the difference between C, C# and C++ then get in touch with me. If you know a colleague or friend that would be interested, they can get in touch with us through our contact page.

We’re looking for another School Partnership Manager
As part of our goal to reach every borough in London (yes all 33 of them!) we are looking for another school partnership manager to join our team. The school partnership manager will be responsible for delivering presentations to schools across London and meeting with school leaders and parents to discuss and pitch our programmes. If you have excellent presentation skills and some experience working in the education sector, you can send us an email with your CV. Want to find out more about the role? You can read this.

Event Volunteers Needed
We ran our first workshop of the term, the GT Scholars Maths Marathon, last week and it went really well! We would like to extend a big thank you to the workshop facilitators and event volunteers who helped make the event a success! If you would like to be a part of our event volunteer team, feel free to get in touch with me.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

 

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Save the date for our next Volunteer Meetup!

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Save the date for our next Volunteer Meetup!

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

We hope you’ve had a fantastic week! As we settle into the new term (and as the little Prince Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor settles into his new crib!), we have a few upcoming opportunities and some great resources we’d like to share. Read on to find out more details!

Volunteer Meetup!
We are excited to announce that our next volunteer meetup will be on Wednesday 24th July 2019 from 6pm-8pm at WeWork Holborn. If you have a friend or colleague that would like to become a volunteer, then this is the perfect opportunity for them to find out more about GT Scholars and our volunteer opportunities. If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with me. We’re really looking forward to seeing you there!

Volunteer Spotlight!
Our Volunteer Spotlight is our way of drawing attention to our amazing volunteers and sharing more about them and their motivation for volunteering. If you’ve volunteered as a tutor, mentor or helped out at one or more of our events in the past term, we’d love for you to feature in our next Spotlight. Please send me a quick email if you’d like to get involved.

Free resources!
If you’re planning your next tutoring or mentoring session and looking for some fresh ideas, you might find these websites useful. BBC Bitesize offers loads of free resources for Maths and English tutors, from past papers to revision questions and quizzes. The National Mentoring Resource Centre includes a full list of mentoring worksheets and guidance notes on their website to help mentors discuss important topics from growth mindset to life skills.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Be a part of the action!

Volunteers and Friends of GT Scholars – Be a part of the action!

Friends of GT Scholars Volunteers

As we come to the end of another week, we hope that yours has been an awesome one! To all our volunteers that are helping to make this term a great one, we send a big thank you. If you feel like you’re missing out on the volunteer action, then read on for more details about our volunteer opportunities.

Event volunteers needed!
On Wednesday 29th May 2019, we’re running a workshop at the Rio Tinto offices in London from 10am to 4pm. We still need volunteers, workshop facilitators and event coordinators for this workshop. Please let me know if you’re available to help on the day and I’ll get in touch to share more details with you.

Quick and easy volunteer opportunities
If you want to volunteer this term but you just don’t have the time to commit to tutoring or mentoring, then we have some great opportunities for you! From guest blogging to helping out at events, there are many other ways to volunteer with us. Find out more by reading this blog and if you find a way that best suits you, please feel free to get in touch with me.

The Fight for Social Mobility
The Social Mobility Commission released its annual State of the Nation report recently. According to the report, the gap in attainment between pupils from low-income backgrounds and their peers resulted in only 16% of this group getting the equivalent of two A Levels, compared with 39% of other pupils. This shows that a lot more needs to be done to support pupils from low-income backgrounds. If you would like to volunteer to help these pupils get the support they need, please get in touch with me.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.