In the Know – Broaden your minds this Summer!

In the Know – Broaden your minds this Summer!

In The Know What's new?

It’s important for young people to keep their minds active this Summer. One way they can do is by immersing themselves in fun, new experiences. This week’s activities are perfect for getting the ball rolling on a season filled with learning exciting things and building new skills.

Apollo 11 Family Festival
The Science Museum in South Kensington is running a free family festival celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the Moon, featuring hands-on activities led by space scientists and enthusiasts. The festival will include a chance to experience life as an astronaut, finding out what happened to all the Moon rocks, discovering how your body changes in space and much more! It is taking place from Saturday 20th to Sunday 21st July and is suitable for 11-14 year olds.  Find out more here

Design for the Future
The V&A Museum is running a free drop-in design workshop that will have young people inventing to save the planet and designing new earth-friendly packaging for food. They will get creative and use screen printing and eco-friendly methods to design and create innovative products. This workshop will take place every Sunday in July in the John Madejski Garden and is suitable for 11-12 year olds.  Find out more here

The Big Bang Fair
The Big Bang Fair organised by STEM Learning will be taking place on Friday 12th July 2019. It is open to young people between the ages of 11 and 18 and will include a range of interactive exhibitions from controlling your own robots, finding out about the underground world of mail rail, a CSI challenge, animation creation, and a careers zone where you can meet real-life scientists and engineers. This event is free and will be taking place at Sutton Grammar School. Find out more here.  

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

How To Build Resilience And Keep Yourself Motivated!

How To Build Resilience And Keep Yourself Motivated!

What's new?

Being resilient and staying motivated is an important part of personal development. It gives you the confidence to face any challenge head-on and it will help you to never give up, even when the challenges get tough.

The first thing to understand when building resilience and keeping yourself motivated is that being motivated and staying motivated are part of the same team but they are not the same players. There are a multitude of things that can inspire you to be motivated but staying motivated is where it can get tricky for most of us. 

However, this is not something one should worry about too much as there are definitely easy and effective ways to learn how to stay motivated. Here are a few tips and tricks that you can use to consistently keep yourself motivated and build resilience in your day-to-day life. 

Form good habits
We all have regular habits we do, like exercising or playing a sport, watching a certain TV show or walking the dog. These are small things that are routine and become habits, which is perfectly okay as it always good to have some form of routine, but it is also good to be more intentional about your daily habits. This simply means finding impactful and effective things to incorporate into the daily habits that help you to grow mentally. For example, you can listen to a short informational and motivational podcast while you get ready for school, you can take up regular meditation or mindfulness, or you can read one book a week. This will help you to keep yourself motivated as it engages you in small habits that make you a better person each and every day.

Set achievable goals
We all have goals that we set out for ourselves which is important, but it’s just as important to be specific and practical when setting out these goals. You also need to know how to achieve your goals – especially your larger long-term goals. One of the best ways to make your larger goals more achievable it to break it down into smaller, short-term goals that are easier to achieve. These small, short-term goals also contribute to building your resilience and keeping you motivated. The reason behind this is that you can see more immediate results from setting small goals, whereas long-term goals will take a lot more time to achieve. If you are not seeing the results that you want sooner, it opens up the door to you becoming demotivated and losing resilience. 

Examples of short-term goals include setting a set number of books to read or videos to watch about something you want to pursue in the future, or saving a small amount of money every week from your pocket money to grow a substantial savings account that you can access in the future.

Find a mentor
Another highly beneficial way to help build your resilience and self-motivation is to get a one-to-one mentor. Mentors help you to find ways to better yourself and they can help you to mould your character in ways you may not be able to do by yourself. Mentors also provide a useful platform to talk about and get advice on your future plans for your career and academics as well as other personal development goals you may want to explore. Mentors can also provide you with good references and recommend other people or organisations who can help you with your future aspirations. If you aren’t sure where to find a good mentor, you can always talk to your parents to help you find a mentor and GT Scholars also offers impactful mentoring programmes to help you reach your goals.

Keep a journal
It’s important to keep track of your goals, aspirations, dreams, and plans. This helps you to see the progress that you make which can motivate you to keep going. Having a journal is one way to keep track of all the things you are doing or planning. You can update it daily or do a weekly account of how far you got with achieving the plans you set out for the week. In your journal, you can also have your long-term goals set out so that you can always refer back to them to remind yourself of where you are wanting to go with your future. You can even create a timeline for your goals so that you can make sure that you are on the right path that you have set out for yourself.

Join after-school activities
Participating in after-school programmes or extracurricular activities help you to engage with other young people and build on your social skills. This can help you to develop self-motivation and resilience. These extracurricular activities also help to grow other personal skills and also expose you to different aspects of life beyond the confines of school and your existing everyday activities. There are so many different extracurricular activities to choose from, from debate teams to sports to volunteering – the options are plentiful and you are sure to find something to pique your interest. You must always remember that learning is not limited to the classroom but comes in many other forms that can really shape you as an individual and help you to realise the options available to you. 

Building resilience and staying motivated is an important part of your growth. When you think of your growth, you should think of it like a city that has many avenues, buildings, stores and a world of other engaging things to discover and learn about. So let your growth be something that you can fully engage in and explore. This will let you enjoy the journey of building resilience and self-motivation you need to achieve the best for yourself. 

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

Great Ideas For One-to-One Tutoring Sessions

Great Ideas For One-to-One Tutoring Sessions

Volunteers What's new?

Tutoring should be a fulfilling experience for your scholar and for yourself. It should not be something that will be dreaded by your scholar and it should be something that is different from how your scholar learns at school.

With that being said, there can sometimes be a tug-of-war between trying to keep the tutoring sessions serious to complete the task at hand and making the sessions enjoyable. Creating a balance between the two is key, and once you are able to achieve that, you will find yourself looking forward to the tutoring sessions with your scholar and they will run more smoothly and effectively. 

One thing to keep in mind is to maintain your structure in terms of the content you intend to teach and the goals you have for those sessions, but be flexible in how you deliver the content and also how you interact with your scholar. Here are a few ideas you can use to keep your tutoring sessions energetic and effective.

Use icebreakers
Your first one-to-one tutoring session can be nerve-wracking for both you and your scholar. One of the ways to combat this feeling is to create or implement session icebreakers. This is a good way to get both of you comfortable and a good way to get to know a bit more about each other beyond the formalities of tutor and scholar. These icebreakers can simply be a 5-minute discussion about general topics outside of the planned content. These discussions can also help you to find the best ways to make the sessions most effective for your scholar.

Personalise your sessions
It is one thing to tutor someone, and another to tutor them effectively and produce the best results. It is important to find out more about your scholar and what they are looking to get out of your sessions and also what they want to personally achieve at school and beyond. Once you can establish a general outline for the first few sessions, you can personalise the sessions in a way which works well for both you and your scholar. 

Be supportive
Providing your scholar with support during each of your one-to-one sessions can greatly improve the way in which you interact with one another and it helps to boost their confidence. You need to be encouraging and to show them that the tutoring sessions are a safe space for them to be open about the areas or topics they struggle in. This will allow them to feel more comfortable and confident in how they approach the content you are tutoring, as well as establishing a respectful and comfortable relationship with you as their tutor. 

Encourage independent thinking
Tutoring is also important for encouraging your scholar to think independently. The idea behind this is to foster a growth mindset within your scholar so that they are able to tackle tasks independently and build their self-confidence. One way to do this is to help them to stand on their own feet and to think beyond the assistance you provide. During your tutoring sessions, you can create a short quiz or other mentally stimulating techniques that will help your scholar to build confidence in the subject and to not be dependent on your teachings alone. This will shift their perspective on how they approach topics, and it will promote their ability to think critically.

Engage your scholar
Another way to make your one-to-one tutoring sessions more productive and fun for both you and your scholar is to keep them engaged. During the session, you can get your scholar to actively participate by asking questions as the session progresses. If you only wait to ask questions at the end, you might lose their attention during the session. Keeping them engaged also creates room for them to ask any questions they may have regarding a particular topic and it allows them to better understand the topics being presented. 

Switch gears
Rather than sticking to the conventional methods of tutoring, you should use different methods to relay the information to your scholar. There are tons of learning tools available for you to use such as online videos, presentations, and other content. Introducing different learning tools makes the sessions less monotonous and more engaging, and it creates different ways for your scholar to learn and retain information. You can also get your scholar to participate by getting them to create short presentations to go over the content and pose any questions they may have for you at the end of their presentation. Furthermore, you can also incorporate the use of funny gifs or memes to get a particular point across. Just as long as it does not take away from the effectiveness of your tuition and their ability to learn, you should always explore new ways to teach your scholar.

Get their feedback
It takes two to tango, and feedback should not only be for you to give but also for you to receive from your scholar. Allow them to express and share their thoughts through feedback sessions, and be open to any constructive criticism. This feedback can then be used to learn how best to work with and for each other through your sessions.

For many scholars, learning can seem like such a task. However, your tutoring sessions should shed a different light on learning and stimulate their desire to learn. So don’t be afraid to try something new in your sessions and give you and your scholar something to always look forward to.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

In the Know – Take your learning outdoors!

In the Know – Take your learning outdoors!

In The Know What's new?

With July being National Picnic Month, it is the perfect opportunity for young people to head outdoors! There are also many outdoor events and activities that will have them learning something new or getting involved in something exciting and fun. Here are a few outdoor activities to get them started.

Holland Park Ecology Centre
Holland Park Ecology Centre in Kensington offers an on-going programme of free informative talks and walks on environment and wildlife topics, open days in the wildlife area, and workshops. They also offer conservation volunteering events every third Saturday of the month, with the next volunteering event taking place on Saturday 20th July. These events give your child the opportunity to get closer to nature, learn new skills, and build their CV. Find out more here

Chelsea Physic Garden
Tucked away beside the Thames, Chelsea Physic Garden is the oldest botanic garden in London and houses around 5,000 different medicinal, herbal, edible, and useful plants. They run a range of activities for young people that will have them learning new things from paper-making to forensic biology, while also enjoying the great outdoors. Tickets for young people cost £6.50 and you can find out more here

Better Takes Action Boat Tour
On Sunday 14th of July, KEEN Footwear and Plastic Whale will be running a unique volunteer event where young people aged 11-18 will be involved in cleaning up the Regent’s Canal on kayaks. This fun volunteer opportunity will get your child closer to nature, involved in making a difference, and it will be a credit to their CV. They will also have a chance to meet inspiring environmentalists and learn more about nature conservation. Find out more here

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

How To Keep Your Scholar Interested In Their Tutoring Sessions

How To Keep Your Scholar Interested In Their Tutoring Sessions

Volunteers What's new?

Being a tutor can be one of the most satisfying and fulfilling roles a person can take on. The opportunity to get to help and guide a young person to improve academically and seeing their progress from the hours you put in during tutoring is worth the time and effort invested.

However, tutoring can sometimes be challenging when trying to keep the momentum and enthusiasm going from the first session to the last session with a scholar. But, there are a few things you can do as a tutor to avoid this or in some cases get out of this slump. Here are a few ways to keep your scholar interested in their tutoring sessions.

Understanding your Scholar
One of the best ways to avoid the disinterest of a scholar is to understand them from the get-go, including what works best for them in terms of grasping concepts and how they relate to you. A constructive way to go about this is to make sure that they are comfortable enough to be able to discuss any potential issues that may or may not arise in the time that you are tutoring them. To do this, you need to create a safe space for your sessions. In creating this safe space, it is also important to establish boundaries with your scholar regarding respect for your role and understanding that there are also rules to ensure that you can do your best as their tutor.

Mutual Feedback
Another avenue to explore is having regular feedback sessions with your scholar. These can focus on one of two aspects. The first aspect is where you ask them how they are finding the tutoring sessions with you and if you are engaging them enough and relaying your knowledge well enough that they are able to comprehend everything. This can be done after your session or you can get them to fill out a questionnaire you’ve prepared via email correspondence. This will let you know where you stand as a tutor and whether the way in which you approach the sessions is working.

The second aspect is where you give them feedback on their progress and the areas you feel they should work on outside of the tutoring sessions. How you approach this feedback session is very important and this is where understanding your scholar also plays in. Some scholars are sensitive to constructive criticism, which can be due to a lack of confidence. So it is important that you give them feedback in the friendliest way possible. It’s also important to reward and praise any progress made. If they feel that you as a tutor don’t see or acknowledge the strides that they are making, it can cause a nonchalant approach towards future sessions and work assigned to them.

Switch Gears
During your time as their tutor, it would be good to implement different approaches to each session in order to keep boredom and disinterest at bay. Incorporating fun but effective elements to the sessions such as interactive games or quizzes can create new ways of learning topics. As long as they do not distract from the learning, these activities foster a positive environment for your scholar to flourish and learn.

When it comes to the structure of the sessions, it is good to be consistent but it’s also important to make sure it’s interactive and inviting. If they enjoy the session, it makes the task at hand easier to approach and the learning more effective. Other elements that you can look into are visual elements such as pictures, GIFs and memes that are related to the topic. You can also use short videos and other activities that stimulate the brain. This will ensure that your scholar leaves your tutoring sessions feeling enlightened and energised.

The Scholar becomes the Master
“But I’m the tutor!” Yes, you most certainly are. This role reversal simply means that you designate the last few minutes to let your scholar teach you what you have taught them in that session. This helps the scholar revise what they have learnt and it also helps you to determine how they are grasping and handling the content you are teaching them. It doesn’t have to be the entire session’s work, but key components of the session that you want to make sure they have understood.

This can also be a spur-of-the-moment test to help them develop their ability to think on their feet and build their confidence in the subject. It also pushes them to revise their work more so that they are not caught off guard in future sessions. This exercise is also beneficial to you as the tutor as you get to observe how effective your tutoring has been and how to improve on it. It fosters growth for both you and your scholar.

Have Patience
Having patience when tutoring a scholar is one of the most important necessities. Some scholars require more time to grasp concepts than others, so you need to be patient with them. Having patience also allows you to take a step back and be more understanding and accommodating of your scholar and it sets the tone between the two of you. It will show them that you are happy to help them and it will encourage them when they are struggling. Patience also goes a long way for many scholars and it is a contributing factor to how your scholar participates and adjusts to your tutoring over the course of the programme.

Tutoring is a rewarding experience that positively impacts you and your scholar in more ways than one. If you feel like you would like to help in making a difference in the lives of young people, then you definitely should volunteer to be a GT Scholars tutor.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.

7 Useful Skills You Can Develop Through Volunteer Mentoring

7 Useful Skills You Can Develop Through Volunteer Mentoring

Volunteers What's new?

Volunteer mentoring is a rewarding role that offers the opportunity to really make a tangible and effective difference in the lives of young people. Volunteer mentors receive a real sense of purpose and many other emotional paybacks from their work.

Together with these rewards, volunteer mentors also learn valuable new skills and experiences that they can apply to their career or personal life. Here a 7 useful skills that you can gain from volunteer mentoring.

Emotional Intelligence
Emotional intelligence is defined as the capacity and ability to be aware of, control, and express one’s emotions effectively. Emotional intelligence affects all areas of your life, especially with regards to handling interpersonal relationships and displaying empathy. As a mentor, you have to listen to your mentee and empathise with their situation. You have to put yourself in their shoes so that you can understand what they are going through and relate it to yourself. You will then have to communicate your understanding in an effective way so that they feel like their feelings are being acknowledged and appreciated. These interactions will build up your emotional intelligence and help you to handle all interpersonal relationships well. In a work environment, this skill will be especially useful when working in a team or with your colleagues in general. It will help you to lead team discussions, resolve and avoid conflicts, and ensure that everyone is cooperating and working together effectively.  

Leadership and Management Skills
As a mentor, you are put in a position of authority and you are looked upon as a role model and a source of guidance. Though this may seem daunting, being a role model teaches you important leadership and management lessons such as responsibility, effective communication, time management, and accountability. It is your responsibility as a mentor to ensure that mentoring sessions take place on schedule, that discussions are productive, and that desired outcomes are reached. It is also your responsibility to motivate your mentee and ensure that they feel supported. These skills will help you manage your work tasks well which will show employers that you are responsible enough to take on leadership roles. 

Adaptability
As a mentor, you will usually work with a different mentee every term or year. This will expose you to a wide range of various young people with different personalities, talents, and aspirations. They will also be from different backgrounds and face different challenges in their everyday life. Through this, you will learn how to adapt your mentoring sessions to the young person specifically. This will build your adaptability skills which will make you more versatile and make it easier for you to work under change or pressure, which is something valued by employers. This exposure to different people will also build interpersonal skills and that will help you to relate to different types of people. This is valuable in the workplace as you will be interacting with many different people from various departments and companies, and also from various cultures and nationalities. 

Self-Reflection and Self-Evaluation
Volunteer mentoring and listening to a young person’s thoughts and feelings will put you in a position to reflect on your own life. You will use your own life and the decisions you made to mentor the young person, setting examples of good and bad responses, reactions, and decisions. Reflecting on yourself allows you to become more self-aware and better at making future decisions. It allows you to pause and evaluate yourself to make sure that you are doing the right thing, and it makes you more aware of the consequences of your actions so that you will now know how to prevent negative outcomes. For example, if you know that a certain habit or behaviour has negative effects on your colleagues or friends, then you will learn to work on changing this habit or behaviour. Self-evaluation is an important part of personal development and it will have positive effects on various aspects of your life.

Resilience
Resilience is about keeping a positive attitude in the face of adversity, and it is often related to self-confidence and self-belief. It is one of the main skills you will teach a young person as a volunteer mentor. It is an important skill that will help them to face current and future challenges, keep a clear mind when dealing with adversity, and to never give up. As a volunteer mentor, you will set a good example by building up your own resilience and believing in yourself. This will greatly increase your confidence which will improve the way you work and interact with people. 

Developing a Personal Brand
As a volunteer mentor, you will be delivering a consistent message to young people that you have developed from your own life, your past decisions, and your experiences. This consistent message will become a personal brand that will be easily identifiable to your mentee. A personal brand will show others that you are someone who has specific skills and talents. It will make you stand out to employers and colleagues and it will make you more confident in yourself and more charismatic. Developing a personal brand is also helpful to entrepreneurs as it will help develop your business identity and to network with other businesses and entrepreneurs. 

Problem Solving
During mentoring sessions, your mentee will usually approach you with a problem or situation that they are facing or not sure how to deal with. They will come to you for encouragement but more importantly for advice and effective solutions. This builds up your problem-solving skills. It will teach you how to look at a problem with objectivity, to find a solution for the problem, and to find a way to prevent the problem from happening again. This skill is something that you will definitely need for any workplace in any career. Even if your work is straightforward and easy, you will eventually face challenges in some way or form that you will need to solve. If you have good problem-solving skills, you will be able to show employers that you can solve a range of challenges, and you will also show them that you can solve challenges without their help. This independence will show them that you are capable and efficient.  

This is by no means an exhaustive list of the skills that you can gain from volunteering as a mentor. You will find even more useful skills and tools that you can apply to both your career and personal life. 

If you would like to help a young person between the ages of 14 and 18 to achieve their career or personal aspirations, then contact us to find out how you can join our after-school mentoring programme. Our mentoring programme welcomes volunteer mentors from various career fields and backgrounds. Visit our website to find out more.

In the Know – STEM events this Summer!

In the Know – STEM events this Summer!

In The Know What's new?

After all the exams and assignments, we’re sure your child is looking forward to having a great summer filled with fun activities. Summer is also a great time to learn something new, so here are a few more fun activities that they can fit in that will have them exploring the world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

The Great Exhibition Road Festival at Imperial College
The Great Exhibition Road Festival is a free 3-day celebration of curiosity, discovery and exploration. Institutions on and around Exhibition Road collaborate to bring together science and the arts in a unique programme of creative workshops, talks, exhibitions and performances for the whole family. Festival activities will take place on and around Exhibition Road in South Kensington on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th June from 11am to 5pm. Find out more here.

Into Space
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Moon landings, Kevin Fong returns to the Royal Institution, to take us on a journey from planet Earth to low orbit and beyond. He’ll also explore human survival against all the odds by discussing how to survive in space. The event is suitable for 12-18 year olds and will be taking place on Monday 22nd July from 6pm. Find out more here.

Mega Maker Lab
The Institute of Imagination is running a summer exhibition dedicated to invention and innovation, where young people aged 11-12 can tinker, experiment and be inspired by science and technology. There are five creative zones to explore that are designed to inspire creativity, invention, and making. The exhibition begins on Thursday 1st August at The Workshop in Lambeth. Tickets cost £5 with discounts available. Find out more here.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

Can Volunteer Tutoring Boost Your CV?

Can Volunteer Tutoring Boost Your CV?

Volunteers What's new?

When it comes to volunteer tutoring, it is often thought that only those on the receiving end of the volunteering service are being benefited. However, there are many short-term and long-term benefits that volunteer tutors receive when they choose to take on this role. One of these benefits is how this volunteer tutor role can boost your CV.

When a potential employer is going through your CV, they will always assess what extracurricular work you have done. When they see that you have previously taken on the role of a volunteer tutor, it reveals a few things about your character and the kind of person they would be bringing on board to work for them.

It shows initiative
Taking on the initiative to be a volunteer tutor is a great way to get your foot in the door to the working world. Potential employers will see that you are not primarily driven by money and that you are willing to put in work when it is needed without being prompted to do so. It shows that the betterment of others is something you take into consideration and that you are also able to think beyond yourself. It also shows that you are proactive and willing to go the extra mile.

More exposure for you
By becoming a volunteer tutor you create more opportunities for yourself to be seen. It makes your CV more captivating to potential employers and gives them an insight into how you spend your time outside of university or work and an overlook of your skills and capabilities. The opportunity to be a volunteer tutor also puts you in an environment you may not usually be exposed to, and in doing so, it allows you to meet other undergraduates and professionals who may be able to pass your CV to other people. This creates a platform for you to network with different peers your age who may also be volunteer tutors, as well as potential organisations you may want to work with in the future. Taking on the role of a volunteer tutor can also expose you to different potential career paths that you can look into.

Improved skills and experience
In as much as you are helping someone else improve their skills through your volunteer tutoring, you are also improving your skills and experience in the process. You have to find ways to be able to relate to the scholars you teach and find ways to relay the information you know to them. This improves with every tutoring session you have and helps to sharpen your communication, leadership, interpersonal, and performance skills. Being a volunteer tutor also helps with improving your thinking skills and personal development. In doing this, it gives you the right skills and experience for the workplace and under different conditions and environments.

Time management
Becoming a volunteer tutor requires you to have good time management in order to balance your academic career and personal time as well as being a tutor. It shows potential employers your organisational skills and how well you are able to manage the demands of studying and tutoring while working under pressure in some instances. Employers like to see that their potential employees have good time management skills and are able to allocate their time accordingly and prioritise different tasks effectively. Taking on the role of a volunteer tutor is also a good way to utilise spare time and learning how to manage that.

Preparation for the future
Being a volunteer tutor helps to prepare you for working environments and other future roles you may look into pursuing. Even though you have the free will to undertake your tutoring sessions in times that work well for both you and your scholar, you still work under a specific structure and you must still meet the required hours as well as produce certain results with regards to your scholar. You also have to maintain a standard of integrity and abide by the rules that govern the volunteers within that organisation. This shows potential employers that you have the ability to follow instructions and how well you are able to fulfil designated tasks and work independently.

It shows that you are reliable
Becoming a volunteer tutor is one thing, but doing the job that is required of you is another. When taking on the role, you have to ensure that you will be able to fully apply yourself to the role. This is an aspect that potential employers look at – how reliable you are and how well do you perform in your role? The more reliable you prove to be, the higher your chances of growing professionally are and the more people trust you to do things that require greater responsibility.

An opportunity for personal enrichment
Lastly, being a volunteer tutor creates room for your own personal enrichment. It helps you discover strengths or interests you may not have known that you had, and it provides you with a different perspective on how you can approach your career and personal life. There are always lessons to be learnt and growth to be experienced when you open your mind to new possibilities. You also learn some of the things that work and don’t work for you and also leave having acquired some self-enhancement through the whole experience.

If you would like to boost your CV and become a volunteer tutor, let us know! GT Scholars runs an after-school tutoring programme that is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic aspirations. We aim to tackle educational inequality and improve social mobility by helping young people gain access to the most selective universities and the most competitive careers. Visit our website to find out how you can become a tutor today.

In the Know – Speaking up to make a difference!

In the Know – Speaking up to make a difference!

In The Know Parents

For young people to make the most out of the academic and career opportunities available to them, they will need to be able to articulate their thoughts and present their ideas well. They will also need to be able to hold their own in a room full of people and engage well with others. Here are a few activities to help your child be confident when speaking and presenting their ideas to other people!

Speak Up: Find Your Voice, Change The World!

This workshop hosted by GT Scholars is open to young people from the ages of 11 to 16. Taking place on Saturday 22nd June from 10am-4pm at Goldsmiths University, your child will get to learn valuable public speaking and presentation skills. They will also find out how to apply their skills to play an active role in their communities and ultimately make a difference in the world! Tickets cost £12.50 and you can book them here. We hope to see you there! Tickets are still available and can be booked via the Eventbrite waiting list.

Practice Makes Perfect!

The best way to improve public speaking skills is to practice and we know just the app that can help young people! VirtualSpeech VR is an app that helps you practice your speaking by creating realistic environments through the use of photos, sounds, and an audience. It even offers interactive courses to help you prepare. Download the free app for Apple or Android here and get your child started today!

Youth Connect!

We Rise is hosting a YouthConnect event on Tuesday 9th July for young people 14 years old and up. This is a great way for your child to not only continue perfecting the art of public speaking, but also other important skills such as communication, brainstorming, and teamwork. Your child will also get to interact with professionals and industry experts. The event is free and will be taking place at 3Space International House. Find out more here. We do

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. We run after-school and weekend programmes that help young people achieve their academic and career aspirations. Our programmes include tutoring, mentoring and enrichment sessions for young people aged 11-18. Contact us if you would like to know more about any of our programmes and courses.

 

Volunteers and Friend of GT Scholars – Volunteer this summer!

Volunteers and Friend of GT Scholars – Volunteer this summer!

Volunteers

Top of the morning to you on this awesome Friday! Hope you are looking forward to the official start of summer this weekend! This week’s newsletter includes some great volunteer opportunities you can get involved in this summer. Curious to find out more? Read on for more details!

Invite us to Speak!
As you know, we are all about creating more opportunities for young people, especially those from low-income backgrounds, to succeed in school and beyond. We would love to share more about what we do with people so that we can increase our reach and help even more young people in need! If you know of any forums or speaking engagements you think we could be a part of to make this happen, then please get in touch with me to chat further.

Did you know!
Foster Care Fortnight, the Fostering Network’s annual campaign to bring awareness to the way foster care transforms lives, took place last week. One of the things highlighted is the large number of young people living in care who struggle with educational attainment and reaching their aspirations. One of the ways you can help to spread awareness about young people living in care is to write a blog post for our website. A blog post is a great way for you to share your thoughts with our scholars and parents, not only about young people living in care, but also on education, social mobility, and careers. If you’d like to be a guest blogger, you can get in touch with me or find out more here.

Follow us on social media!
We would love for you to follow us on any of our social media platforms so that you can like, share and comment on our posts and also share other posts you think would make for an interesting blog post! Join the conversation on our Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram pages.

GT Scholars is a not-for-profit social enterprise and registered charity. Our after-school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programme is designed to help young people aged 11-18 achieve their academic and career aspirations. Visit our website if you’d like to know more about the GT Scholars Programme and how you can make a significant difference in young people’s lives.